add a command for debugging MPI on macOS
[dealii.wiki.git] / Frequently-Asked-Questions.md
1 # The deal.II FAQ
2 This page collects a few answers to questions that have frequently been asked about deal.II and that we thought are worth recording as they may be useful to others as well.
3
4 ## Table of Contents
5   * [The deal.II FAQ](#the-dealii-faq)
6     * [Table of Contents](#table-of-contents)
7     * [General questions on deal.II](#general-questions-on-dealii)
8       * [Can I use/implement triangles/tetrahedra in deal.II?](#can-i-useimplement-trianglestetrahedra-in-dealii)
9       * [I'm stuck!](#im-stuck)
10       * [I'm not sure the mailing list is the right place to ask ...](#im-not-sure-the-mailing-list-is-the-right-place-to-ask-)
11       * [How fast is deal.II?](#how-fast-is-dealii)
12       * [deal.II programs behave differently in 1d than in 2/3d](#dealii-programs-behave-differently-in-1d-than-in-23d)
13       * [I want to use deal.II for work in my company. Do I need a special license?](#i-want-to-use-dealii-for-work-in-my-company-do-i-need-a-special-license)
14     * [Supported System Architectures](#supported-system-architectures)
15       * [Can I use deal.II on a Windows platform?](#can-i-use-dealii-on-a-windows-platform)
16         * [Run deal.II natively on Windows](#run-dealii-natively-on-windows)
17         * [Run deal.II through a virtual box](#run-dealii-through-a-virtual-box)
18         * [Dual-boot your machine with Ubuntu](#dual-boot-your-machine-with-ubuntu)
19       * [Can I use deal.II on an Apple Macintosh?](#can-i-use-dealii-on-an-apple-macintosh)
20       * [Does deal.II support shared memory parallel computing?](#does-dealii-support-shared-memory-parallel-computing)
21       * [Does deal.II support parallel computing with message passing?](#does-dealii-support-parallel-computing-with-message-passing)
22       * [How does deal.II support multi-threading?](#how-does-dealii-support-multi-threading)
23       * [My deal.II installation links with the Threading Building Blocks (TBB) but doesn't appear to use multiple threads!](#my-dealii-installation-links-with-the-threading-building-blocks-tbb-but-doesnt-appear-to-use-multiple-threads)
24     * [Configuration and Compiling](#configuration-and-compiling)
25       * [Where do I start?](#where-do-i-start)
26       * [I tried to install deal.II on system X and it does not work](#i-tried-to-install-dealii-on-system-x-and-it-does-not-work)
27       * [How do I change the compiler?](#how-do-i-change-the-compiler)
28       * [I can configure and compile the library but installation fails. What is going on?](#i-can-configure-and-compile-the-library-but-installation-fails-what-is-going-on)
29       * [I get warnings during linking when compiling the library. What's wrong?](#i-get-warnings-during-linking-when-compiling-the-library-whats-wrong)
30       * [I can't seem to link/run with PETSc](#i-cant-seem-to-linkrun-with-petsc)
31         * [Is there a sure-fire way to compile deal.II with PETSc?](#is-there-a-sure-fire-way-to-compile-dealii-with-petsc)
32         * [I want to use HYPRE through PETSc](#i-want-to-use-hypre-through-petsc)
33         * [Is there a sure-fire way to compile dealii with SLEPc?](#is-there-a-sure-fire-way-to-compile-dealii-with-slepc)
34       * [Trilinos detection fails with an error in the file Sacado.hpp or <code>Sacado_cmath.hpp</code>](#trilinos-detection-fails-with-an-error-in-the-file-sacadohpp-or-sacado_cmathhpp)
35       * [My program links with some template parameters but not with others.](#my-program-links-with-some-template-parameters-but-not-with-others)
36       * [When trying to run my program on Mac OS X, I get image errors.](#when-trying-to-run-my-program-on-mac-os-x-i-get-image-errors)
37     * [C++ questions](#c-questions)
38       * [What integrated development environment (IDE) works well with deal.II?](#what-integrated-development-environment-ide-works-well-with-dealii)
39       * [Is there a good introduction to C++?](#is-there-a-good-introduction-to-c)
40       * [Are there features of C++ that you avoid in deal.II?](#are-there-features-of-c-that-you-avoid-in-dealii)
41       * [Why use templates for the space dimension?](#why-use-templates-for-the-space-dimension)
42       * [Doesn't it take forever to compile templates?](#doesnt-it-take-forever-to-compile-templates)
43       * [Why do I need to use typename in all these templates?](#why-do-i-need-to-use-typename-in-all-these-templates)
44       * [Why do I need to use this-&gt; in all these templates?](#why-do-i-need-to-use-this--in-all-these-templates)
45       * [Does deal.II require C++11 support?](#does-dealii-require-c11-support)
46         * [deal.II version 9.0.0](#dealii-version-900)
47         * [deal.II version 8.5.0 and previous](#dealii-version-850-and-previous)
48       * [Can I convert Triangulation cell iterators to DoFHandler cell iterators?](#can-i-convert-triangulation-cell-iterators-to-dofhandler-cell-iterators)
49     * [Questions about specific behavior of parts of deal.II](#questions-about-specific-behavior-of-parts-of-dealii)
50       * [How do I create the mesh for my problem?](#how-do-i-create-the-mesh-for-my-problem)
51       * [How do I describe complex boundaries?](#how-do-i-describe-complex-boundaries)
52       * [I am using discontinuous Lagrange elements (FE_DGQ) but they don't seem to have vertex degrees of freedom!?](#i-am-using-discontinuous-lagrange-elements-fe_dgq-but-they-dont-seem-to-have-vertex-degrees-of-freedom)
53       * [How do I access values of discontinuous elements at vertices?](#how-do-i-access-values-of-discontinuous-elements-at-vertices)
54       * [Does deal.II support anisotropic finite element shape functions?](#does-dealii-support-anisotropic-finite-element-shape-functions)
55       * [The graphical output files don't make sense to me -- they seem to have too many degrees of freedom!](#the-graphical-output-files-dont-make-sense-to-me----they-seem-to-have-too-many-degrees-of-freedom)
56       * [In my graphical output, the solution appears discontinuous at hanging nodes](#in-my-graphical-output-the-solution-appears-discontinuous-at-hanging-nodes)
57       * [When I run the tutorial programs, I get slightly different results](#when-i-run-the-tutorial-programs-i-get-slightly-different-results)
58       * [How do I access the whole vector in a parallel MPI computation?](#how-do-i-access-the-whole-vector-in-a-parallel-mpi-computation)
59       * [How to get the (mapped) position of support points of my element?](#how-to-get-the-mapped-position-of-support-points-of-my-element)
60     * [Debugging deal.II applications](#debugging-dealii-applications)
61       * [I don't have a whole lot of experience programming large-scale software. Any recommendations?](#i-dont-have-a-whole-lot-of-experience-programming-large-scale-software-any-recommendations)
62       * [Are there strategies to avoid bugs in the first place?](#are-there-strategies-to-avoid-bugs-in-the-first-place)
63       * [How can deal.II help me find bugs?](#how-can-dealii-help-me-find-bugs)
64       * [Should I use a debugger?](#should-i-use-a-debugger)
65       * [deal.II aborts my program with an error message](#dealii-aborts-my-program-with-an-error-message)
66       * [The program aborts saying that an exception was thrown, but I can't find out where](#the-program-aborts-saying-that-an-exception-was-thrown-but-i-cant-find-out-where)
67       * [I get an exception in virtual dealii::Subscriptor::~Subscriptor() that makes no sense to me!](#i-get-an-exception-in-virtual-dealiisubscriptorsubscriptor-that-makes-no-sense-to-me)
68       * [I get an error that the solver doesn't converge. But which solver?](#i-get-an-error-that-the-solver-doesnt-converge-but-which-solver)
69       * [How do I know whether my finite element solution is correct? (Or: What is the "Method of Manufactured Solutions"?)](#how-do-i-know-whether-my-finite-element-solution-is-correct-or-what-is-the-method-of-manufactured-solutions)
70       * [My program doesn't produce the expected output!](#my-program-doesnt-produce-the-expected-output)
71       * [The solution converges initially, but the error doesn't go down below 10<sup>-8</sup>!](#the-solution-converges-initially-but-the-error-doesnt-go-down-below-10-8)
72       * [My code converges with one version of deal.II but not with another](#my-code-converges-with-one-version-of-dealii-but-not-with-another)
73       * [My time dependent solver does not produce the correct answer!](#my-time-dependent-solver-does-not-produce-the-correct-answer)
74       * [My Newton method for a nonlinear problem does not converge (or converges too slowly)!](#my-newton-method-for-a-nonlinear-problem-does-not-converge-or-converges-too-slowly)
75       * [Printing deal.II data types in debuggers is barely readable!](#printing-dealii-data-types-in-debuggers-is-barely-readable)
76       * [My program is slow!](#my-program-is-slow)
77       * [How do I debug MPI programs?](#how-do-i-debug-mpi-programs)
78       * [I have an MPI program that hangs](#i-have-an-mpi-program-that-hangs)
79       * [One statement/block/function in my MPI program takes a long time](#one-statementblockfunction-in-my-mpi-program-takes-a-long-time)
80     * [I have a special kind of equation!](#i-have-a-special-kind-of-equation)
81       * [Where do I start?](#where-do-i-start-1)
82       * [Can I solve my particular problem?](#can-i-solve-my-particular-problem)
83       * [Why use deal.II instead of writing my application from scratch?](#why-use-dealii-instead-of-writing-my-application-from-scratch)
84       * [Can I solve problems over complex numbers?](#can-i-solve-problems-over-complex-numbers)
85       * [How can I solve a problem with a system of PDEs instead of a single equation?](#how-can-i-solve-a-problem-with-a-system-of-pdes-instead-of-a-single-equation)
86       * [Is it possible to use different models/equations on different parts of the domain?](#is-it-possible-to-use-different-modelsequations-on-different-parts-of-the-domain)
87       * [Where do I start to implement a new Finite Element Class?](#where-do-i-start-to-implement-a-new-finite-element-class)
88     * [General finite element questions](#general-finite-element-questions)
89       * [How do I compute the error](#how-do-i-compute-the-error)
90       * [How to plot the error as a pointwise function](#how-to-plot-the-error-as-a-pointwise-function)
91       * [I'm trying to plot the right hand side vector but it doesn't seem to make sense!](#im-trying-to-plot-the-right-hand-side-vector-but-it-doesnt-seem-to-make-sense)
92       * [What does XXX mean?](#what-does-xxx-mean)
93     * [I want to contribute to the development of deal.II!](#i-want-to-contribute-to-the-development-of-dealii)
94     * [I found a typo or a bug and fixed it on my machine. How do I get it included in deal.II?](#i-found-a-typo-or-a-bug-and-fixed-it-on-my-machine-how-do-i-get-it-included-in-dealii)
95     * [I'm fluent in deal.II, are there jobs for me?](#im-fluent-in-dealii-are-there-jobs-for-me)
96
97 ## General questions on deal.II
98
99 ### Can I use/implement triangles/tetrahedra in deal.II?
100
101 This is truly one of the most frequently asked questions. The short answer
102 is: No, you can't. deal.II's basic data structures are too much tailored to
103 quadrilaterals and hexahedra to make this trivially possible. Implementing
104 other reference cells such as triangles and tetrahedra amounts to
105 re-implementing nearly all grid and DoF classes from scratch, along with
106 the finite element shape functions, mappings, quadratures and a whole host
107 of other things. Making triangles and tetrahedra work would certainly involve
108 having to write several ten thousand lines of code, and to make it usable
109 in all the rest of the library would require auditing a very significant
110 fraction of the 600,000 lines of code that make up deal.II today.
111
112 That said, the current specialization on quadrilaterals and hexahedra has
113 two very positive aspects: First, quadrilaterals and hexahedra typically
114 provide a significantly better approximation quality than triangular meshes
115 with the same number of degrees of freedom; you therefore get more accurate
116 solutions for the same amount of work. Secondly, because the shape of cells
117 are known, we can make a lot of things known to the compiler (such as the
118 number of iterations of a loop over all vertices of a cell) which avoid a
119 large number of run-time computations and makes the library as fast as it
120 is. A simple example is that in deal.II we know that a loop over all
121 vertices of a cell has exactly `GeometryInfo<dim>::vertices_per_cell`
122 iterations, a number that is known to the compiler at compile-time. If we
123 allowed both triangles and quadrilaterals, the loop would have
124 `cell->n_vertices()` iterations, but this would in general not be known at
125 compile time and consequently not allow the compiler to optimize on.
126
127 If you do need to work with a geometry for which all you have is a
128 triangular or tetrahedral mesh, then you can convert this mesh into one
129 that consists of quadrilaterals and hexahedra using the `tethex` program,
130 see https://github.com/martemyev/tethex .
131
132 ### I'm stuck!
133
134 Further down below on this page (in the debugging section) we list a number
135 of strategies on how to find errors in your program. If your question is
136 how to implement something new for which you don't know where to start,
137 have you taken a look at the set of tutorial programs and checked whether
138 one or the other already has something that's close to what you want?
139
140 That said, there will be situations where documentation doesn't help and
141 where you need other someone else's opinion. That's what the [deal.II
142 mailing lists](http://dealii.org/mail.html) are there for: Feel free to
143 ask! You may also wish to subscribe to the users' list -- not so much
144 because someone else might ask the same question you have, but because
145 reading the list gives you background information on things others are
146 working on that may help you when you want to do something similar.
147
148 When asking for help on the mailing list, be specific. We frequently get mail of the following kind:
149 <pre>
150   I'm trying to do X. This works fine but it fails when I try to transfer
151   the data to my MyClass::Estimator object. I tried to use something
152   similar to what's done in a couple of tutorial programs but it doesn't
153   work. I'm new at C++ and I just can't seem to get the syntax right.
154 </pre>
155
156 This message doesn't contain nearly enough information for anyone to really
157 help you: we don't know what `MyClass::Estimator` is, we don't know how you
158 try to transfer data, we haven't seen your code, and we haven't seen the
159 compiler's error messages. (For more examples of how not to write help
160 requests, see [Section 3.2 of this
161 document](http://faculty.washington.edu/dchinn/how-not-to-code.pdf).) We
162 could poke in the dark, but it would probably be more productive if you
163 gave us a bit more detail explaining what doesn't work: show us the code
164 you implemented, show us the compiler's error message, or be specific in
165 some other way in describing what the problem is!
166
167 ### I'm not sure the mailing list is the right place to ask ...
168
169 Yes, it probably is. Please direct your questions to the mailing list and
170 not to individual developers. There are many reasons:
171
172   1. Others might have similar questions in the future and can search the
173      archives.
174   1. There are many active users on the mailing list that are happy to
175      help. There probably is someone who did something very similar before.
176   1. Imagine everyone would stop using the mailing list and email us
177      directly. We would spend most of our time answering the same questions
178      over and over.
179   1. Many users are reading the mailing list and are interested in deal.II
180      in general and are learning by skimming emails. Give them a chance.
181   1. As a consequence of all this, we typically prioritize questions on
182      mailing lists over emails sent directly to us asking for help.
183   1. Don't be afraid. There are no stupid questions (only off-topic ones).
184      Everyone started out at some point. Asking the questions in the open
185      helps us improve the library and documentation.
186
187 That said, if there is something you can not discuss in the open, feel free
188 to contact us!
189
190
191 ### How fast is deal.II?
192
193 The answer to this question really depends on your metric. If you had to
194 write, say, a Stokes solver with a particular linear solver, a particular
195 time stepping scheme, on a piecewise polygonal domain, and Q2/Q1 elements,
196 you can write a code that is 20% or 30% faster than what you would get when
197 using deal.II because you know the building blocks, shape functions,
198 mappings, etc. But it'll take you 6 months to do so, and 20,000 lines of
199 code. On the other hand, when using deal.II, you can do it in 2 weeks and
200 204 lines (that's the number of semicolons in step-22).
201
202 In other words, if by "fast" you mean the absolute maximal efficiency in
203 terms of CPU time deal.II is more than likely to lose against a
204 hand-written Fortran77 code. But for most of us, the real question of
205 "fast" also includes the time it takes to get the code running and
206 verified, and in that case deal.II is most likely the fastest library out
207 there simply by virtue of the fact that it is by far the largest and most
208 comprehensive finite element library available as Open Source.
209
210 This all, by the way, does not mean that we don't care about speed: We
211 spend a lot of effort profiling the library and working on the hot spots to
212 make codes fast. The discussion of this issue in the introduction of
213 step-22 is a good example. There are also some guidelines below on how to
214 profile your code in the debugging section of this FAQ.
215
216 ### deal.II programs behave differently in 1d than in 2/3d
217
218 In deal.II, you can write programs that look exactly the same in 2d and 3d,
219 but there are cases where 1d is slightly different. That said, this is an
220 area that we have significantly rewritten, and starting with deal.II 7.1,
221 most cases should work in 1d in just the same way as they do in 2d/3d. If
222 you find something that doesn't work, please report it to the mailing list.
223
224 Historically, the differences primarily resulted from the fact that in
225 deal.II, we represent vertices differently from lines and quads; whereas
226 the latter can store information (for example boundary indicators, user
227 flags, etc) vertices don't. As a consequence, the boundary indicator of a
228 boundary part in 1d (i.e. either the left or right vertex) were determined
229 by convention, rather than by setting it explicitly: the left boundary of a
230 1d domain always had boundary indicator zero, the right boundary always
231 boundary indicator one. This was different from the 2d/3d case where by
232 default (unless you explicitly set things differently) all boundaries have
233 indicator zero. This left-boundary-has-id-0, right-boundary-has-id-1 is
234 still the default today, but at least you can set the boundary indicators
235 of these end-points to something different today.
236
237 A second difference is that vertices have no extent, and so you can't apply
238 quadrature to them. As a consequence, the FEFaceValues class wasn't usable
239 in 1d. Again, this should work these days: every quadrature formula that
240 has a single quadrature point is a valid one for points as well.
241
242 ### I want to use deal.II for work in my company. Do I need a special license?
243
244 Before going into any more details, you **need** to carefully read the
245 license deal.II is under. In particular, the explanations below are not meant
246 to be legal advice and does not override the provisions in the Open Source
247 license.
248
249 However, before this, let us provide our overarching philosophy: It is our
250 intention to have constructive relationships with those who want to use our
251 work commercially, and we encourage commercial use. After having used a
252 more restrictive license until 2013, we have come to the conclusion that
253 these licenses serve neither side particularly well: it made commercial use
254 difficult, and the lack of commercial use deprived us of critical feedback,
255 potential contributions from professional users, and our users of potential
256 employment opportunities. Everyone is better off with the LGPL license we
257 are using now, and we hope that deal.II also finds use in commercial
258 settings.
259
260 Now for the smaller print: Generally, the LGPL is a fairly liberal license.
261 In particular, if you *develop a code based on deal.II*, then there is no
262 requirement that you also open source your own code: you can keep it closed
263 source, under a proprietary license, and you don't need to give it to
264 anyone (neither your customers nor to us).
265
266 The LGPL is only restrictive in that the *changes you make to deal.II
267 itself* must also be licensed under the LGPL. There is not frequently a
268 need to change the library itself, and in many of these cases you will
269 probably be interested to get them into the upstream development sources
270 anyway (e.g., in cases of bugs) rather than having to forward port them
271 indefinitely. Of course, we are interested in this as well. However, there
272 is no such requirement that you upstream these changes: the only people you
273 have to make these modifications to deal.II available to are your
274 customers.
275
276 As mentioned above, the preceding paragraphs are not a legal
277 interpretation. For definite interpretations of the LGPL, you may want to
278 consult lawyers familiar with the topic or search the web for more detailed
279 interpretations.
280
281
282 ## Supported System Architectures
283
284 ### Can I use deal.II on a Windows platform?
285
286 deal.II has been developed with a Unix-like environment in mind and it
287 shows in a number of places regarding the build system and compilers
288 supported. That said, there are multiple methods to get deal.II running if
289 you have a Windows machine.
290
291
292 #### Run deal.II natively on Windows
293
294 Since deal.II 8.4.0 we have experimental support for Microsoft Visual Studio (2013 and 2015). See the separate page on [[Windows]] for more details.
295
296 #### Run deal.II through a virtual box
297
298 The simplest way to try out deal.II is to run it in a premade virtual
299 machine. You can download the virtual machine for VirtualBox from
300 http://www.math.clemson.edu/~heister/dealvm/ and run it inside windows.
301
302 Note that your experience depends on how powerful your machine is. More
303 than 4GB RAM are recommended. A native installation of Linux is preferable
304 (see below).
305
306 #### Dual-boot your machine with Ubuntu
307
308 The simplest way to install Linux as a Windows user is to dual-boot.
309 Dual-boot means that you simply install a second operating system on your
310 computer and you choose which one to start when you boot the machine. Most
311 versions of Linux support installing themselves as a second operating
312 system. One example is using the Ubuntu installer for Windows. This
313 installer will automatically dual-boot your system for you in a safe and
314 fully reversible manner. Simply follow the instructions on
315 http://www.ubuntu.com/download/desktop/install-ubuntu-with-windows
316
317 If at some point in the future you wish to remove Ubuntu from your system,
318 from the Windows program manager (add-remove programs in older versions and
319 programs and features in newer versions) you can simply uninstall Ubuntu as
320 you would any other program.
321
322 *Note:* The actual install file is linked through the text "Windows
323 installer" in the first gray box.  You will be prompted to donate to
324 Ubuntu, which is entirely optional. You will also be prompted to use a
325 different version of Ubuntu if you use Windows 8.
326
327 ### Can I use deal.II on an Apple Macintosh?
328
329 Yes, at least on the more modern OS X operating systems this works just
330 fine. deal.II supports native compilers shipping with XCode as well as gcc
331 from Mac Ports.
332
333 The only issue we are currently aware of is that if deal.II is configured
334 to interface with PETSc, then PETSc needs to be configured with the
335 <code>--with-x=0</code> flag to prevent linking in the X11 libraries (you
336 probably won't need them anyway). Installing with PETSc has a myriad of
337 other problems, though we believe that we have a way to stably interface
338 it. You may want to read through the PETSc-related entries further down,
339 however.
340
341 ### Does deal.II support shared memory parallel computing?
342
343 Yes. deal.II supports multithreading with the help of the
344 [http://www.threadingbuildingblocks.org Threading Building Blocks (TBB)
345 library](c967ec2ff74d85bd4327f9f773a93af3]). It is enabled by default and
346 can be controlled via the `DEAL_II_WITH_THREADS` configuration toggle
347 passed to `cmake` (see the deal.II readme file).
348
349 ### Does deal.II support parallel computing with message passing?
350
351 Yes, and in fact it has been shown to scale very nicely to at least 16,384
352 processor cores in a paper by Bangerth, Burstedde, Heister and Kronbichler.
353 You should take a look at the documentation modules discussing parallel
354 computing, as well as the step-40 tutorial program.
355
356
357 ### How does deal.II support multi-threading?
358
359 deal.II will use multi-threading using several approaches:
360 1. some BLAS routines might be multi-threaded (typically using OpenMP).
361    This can be controlled from the command line using OMP_NUM_THREADS (also
362    see the entry in the FAQ below)
363 2. Many places in the library are parallelized using the Threading Building
364    Blocks (TBB) library.
365
366 MPI_InitFinalize() has an optional third argument that specifies the number
367 of threads to use for the TBB. The default is 1. This gets send to the TBB
368 via a call to  MultithreadInfo::set_thread_limit(). If you pass
369 numbers::invalid_unsigned_int into MPI_InitFinalize (or if you don't use
370 that class, call set_thread_limit directly) then TBB will use the maximum
371 number of threads that makes sense (and you can limit it using
372 DEAL_II_NUM_THREADS from the command line).
373
374 Also note that while our Trilinos wrappers support multi-threading, the
375 PETSc wrappers do not support this at this time, so you need to run with
376 one thread per process.
377
378 ### My deal.II installation links with the Threading Building Blocks (TBB) but doesn't appear to use multiple threads!
379
380 This may be a quirky interaction with the [GOTO
381 BLAS](http://www.tacc.utexas.edu/tacc-projects/gotoblas2/) :-( If you use
382 Trilinos or PETSc, both of these require a BLAS library from your system,
383 and the deal.II cmake configuration will make sure that it is linked with.
384 The problem stems from the fact that by default, the GOTO BLAS will simply
385 grab all cores of the system for its own use, and -- before your `main()`
386 function even starts, allow the main thread to use only a single core. (For
387 the technically interested: it sets the processor scheduling affinity mask,
388 using `set_sched_affinity` to a single bit.)
389
390 When the TBB initialization runs, still before `main()` starts, it will
391 find that it can only run on a single core and will consequently not be
392 able to work on multiple tasks in parallel.
393
394 The solution to this problem is to forbid the GOTO BLAS to grab all
395 processors for itself, since we spend very little time in BLAS anyway. This
396 can be done by setting either the `OMP_NUM_THREADS` or `GOTO_NUM_THREADS`
397 environment variables to 1, see
398 http://www.tacc.utexas.edu/tacc-software/gotoblas2/faq .
399
400
401 ## Configuration and Compiling
402
403 ### Where do I start?
404
405 Have a look at the  [ReadMe instructions](http://www.dealii.org/developer/readme.html) for details on how to configure and install the library with `cmake`.
406
407 ### I tried to install deal.II on system X and it does not work
408
409 That does occasionally (though relatively rarely) happen, in particular if
410 you work on an operating system or with a compiler that the primary
411 developers don't have access to. In a case like this, you should ask for
412 help on the mailing list. However, remember: If your question only contains
413 the text "I tried to install deal.II on system X and it does not work" then
414 that's not quite enough to figure out what is happening. Even though the
415 people developing this software belong to the most able programmers in the
416 universe (and a decent number of parallel universes), all of us need data
417 to find errors. So, whatever went wrong, paste the error message into your
418 email. If the error is from the `cmake` invocation, show us the error
419 message that was printed on screen.
420 If the error happens after configuring and during compiling, add lines from
421 screen output showing the error to the mail.
422
423
424 ### How do I change the compiler?
425
426 deal.II can be compiled by a number of compilers without problems (see the
427 section [prerequisites](http://www.dealii.org/readme.html#prerequisites) in
428 the readme file). If `cmake` does not pick the right one, selecting another
429 is simple, and described in a
430 [section](http://www.dealii.org/developer/development/cmake.html#compiler)
431 in the [cmake
432 documentation](http://www.dealii.org/developer/development/cmake.html).
433
434 ### I can configure and compile the library but installation fails. What is going on?
435
436 If you configure with the default ``CMAKE_INSTALL_PREFIX``, the library is configured to installed to ``/usr/local`` and this fails without superuser rights with an error message like
437 ```
438 CMake Error at cmake/scripts/cmake_install.cmake:42 (FILE):
439   file cannot create directory: /usr/local/common/scripts.  Maybe need
440   administrative privileges.
441 ```
442 Please see the [readme](http://www.dealii.org/developer/readme.html#configuration) on how to pick an install directory with write access (for example some path below your home directory).
443
444 ### I get warnings during linking when compiling the library. What's wrong?
445
446 On some linux distributions with particular versions of the system
447 compiler, one can get warnings like these during the linking stage of
448 compiling the library:
449 ```
450 `.L3019' referenced in section `.rodata' of
451 /home/bangerth/deal.II/lib/lac/sparse_matrix.float.g.o: defined in discarded section
452 `.gnu.linkonce.t._ZN15SparsityPattern21optimized_lower_boundEPKjS1_RS0_'
453 of /home/bangerth/deal.II/lib/lac/sparse_matrix.float.g.o
454 ```
455
456 While annoying, these warnings do not actually seem to indicate anything
457 particularly harmful. Apparently, the compiler generates the same code
458 multiple times in exactly the same form, and the linker is only warning
459 that it is throwing away all but one of the copies. There doesn't seem to
460 be way to avoid these warnings, but they can be safely ignored.
461
462 ### I can't seem to link/run with PETSc
463
464 Recent deal.II releases support PETSc 3.0 and later. This works, but there
465 are a number of things that can go wrong and that result in compilation or
466 linker errors, as explained below. If your program links properly with
467 PETSc support, it will very likely also produce the correct results.
468
469 If you get errors like this when trying to run step-17 of the tutorials,
470 even though linking seems to have succeeded just fine:
471 ```
472    [make run
473    ============================ Running step-17
474    ./step-17: error while loading shared libraries: libpetsc.so: cannot open
475               shared object file: No such file or directory
476    make: *** [run](step-17]) Error 127
477 ```
478
479 this means is that while linking, the compiler could find the libpetsc.so
480 library, but the executable can't find it when running. The reason is that
481 we can tell the linker where to look, but the executable apparently did not
482 remember this (this is the standard Unix behavior). What you have to do is
483 to set the LD_LIBRARY_PATH to include the path to the PETSc libraries. For
484 example, under `bash` you would have to do this:
485 ```
486    export LD_LIBRARY_PATH=/path/to/petsc/libraries:$LD_LIBRARY_PATH
487 ```
488
489 If you do so, the Unix loader can query the environment variable for where
490 to find this particular library when trying to run the executable, and
491 running the program should succeed.
492
493 Similarly, if you get errors of the kind during linking
494 ```
495 /home/xxx/deal.II/lib/libdeal_II.g.so: undefined reference to
496 `KSPSetInitialGuessNonzero(_p_KSP*, PetscTruth)'
497 /home/xxx/deal.II/lib/libdeal_II.g.so: undefined reference to
498 `VecAXPY(_p_Vec*, double, _p_Vec*)'
499 ...
500 ```
501
502 then the compiler can't seem to find the PETSc libraries. The solution is
503 as above: specify the path to those libraries via `LD_LIBRARY_PATH`.
504
505
506 #### Is there a sure-fire way to compile deal.II with PETSc?
507
508 Short answer is "No". The slightly longer answer is, "PETSc has too many
509 knobs, switches, dials, and a kitchen sink too many for its own damned
510 good. There is not a sure-fire way to compile deal.II with PETSc!". It
511 turns out that PETSc is a very versatile machine and, as such, there is no
512 shortage of things that can go wrong in trying to configure PETSc to work
513 seamlessly with deal.II on a first attempt. We have all struggled with
514 this, although it has become a lot better in recent years.
515
516 You can find instructions on how to install PETSc linked to from the
517 deal.II ReadMe file, or going directly to
518 http://www.dealii.org/developer/external-libs/petsc.html .
519
520 #### I want to use HYPRE through PETSc
521
522 Hypre implements algebraic multigrid methods (AMG) as preconditioners, for
523 example the BoomerAMG method. AMGs are among the most efficient
524 preconditioners available and they have also been shown to be scalable to
525 thousands of processors. deal.II allows the use of Hypre through the
526 PETScWrappers::PreconditionBoomerAMG class; it is used in `step-40`. Hypre
527 can be installed as a sub-package of PETSc and deal.II can access it
528 through the PETSc interfaces.
529
530 To use the Hypre interfaces through PETSc, you need to configure PETSc as
531 discussed in http://www.dealii.org/developer/external-libs/petsc.html  ,
532 and add the following switch to the command line: `--download-hypre=1`.
533
534 #### Is there a sure-fire way to compile dealii with SLEPc?
535
536 Happily, the answer to this question is a definite yes; that is, <b>if you
537 have successfully compiled and linked PETSc already</b>.
538
539 The real trick here is that during configuration SLEPc will pull out
540 PETSc's configuration and just does whatever that tells it to do. Detailed
541 steps are discussed in
542 http://www.dealii.org/developer/external-libs/slepc.html .
543
544 Once deal.II is compiled, it is worth to start by looking at the step-36
545 tutorial program to see how to get started using the interface with SLEPc.
546
547 <i>
548 Note: To use the solvers and other algorithms SLEPc provides it is
549 absolutely essential to have your PETSc installation working correctly
550 since they share the same vector-matrix (and other) data structures.
551 </i>
552
553
554 ### Trilinos detection fails with an error in the file `Sacado.hpp` or `Sacado_cmath.hpp`
555
556 This is a complicated one (and it should also be fixed in more recent
557 Trilinos versions). In the Trilinos file `Sacado_cmath.hpp`, there is some
558 code of the form
559 ```cpp
560   namespace std
561   {
562     inline float acosh(float x)
563     {
564       return std::log(x + std::sqrt(x*x - float(1.0)));
565     }
566     ...
567   }
568 ```
569
570 In other words, Sacado is putting things into namespace `std`. The functions it
571 is putting there are functions that have been defined by the C99 standard but
572 that didn't make it into the C++98 standard before; some of them are widely
573 used. The problem is that these functions were later added to the standard and
574 so if your compiler is new enough (e.g. GCC 4.5 and later) then the compiler's
575 C++ standard library already contains these functions. Adding them again in this
576 file then yields errors of the kind
577 ```
578 /home/.../trilinos-10.4.2/include/Sacado_cmath.hpp: In function 'float std::acosh(float)':
579 /home/.../trilinos-10.4.2/include/Sacado_cmath.hpp:41:16: error: redefinition of 'float std::acosh(float)'
580 /usr/include/c++/4.5/tr1_impl/cmath:321:3: error: 'float std::acosh(float)' previously defined here
581 ```
582
583 The only useful way to avoid this error is to edit the Trilinos header
584 file. To do this, find and open the file `include/Sacado_cmath.hpp` in the
585 directory in which Trilinos was installed. Then change the block enclosed
586 in
587 ```cpp
588   namespace std
589   {
590     ...
591   }
592 ```
593
594 to read
595 ```cpp
596 #ifndef _GLIBCXX_USE_C99_MATH
597   namespace std
598   {
599     ...
600   }
601 #endif
602 ```
603
604 What this will do is make sure that the new members of namespace `std` are
605 only added if the compiler has not already done so itself.
606
607
608
609
610 ### My program links with some template parameters but not with others.
611
612 deal.II has many types for whose initialization you need to provide a
613 template parameter, e.g. `SparseMatrix<double>`. The implementation of
614 these classes can typically be found in files ending `.templates.h`, e.g.
615 `sparse_matrix.templates.h`. The corresponding `.cc` files, e.g.
616 `sparse_matrix.cc`, essentially only provide the explicit instantiations of
617 these classes for the most commonly used template parameters. Sometimes
618 this is done by including a corresponding `.inst` file, e.g.
619 `sparse_matrix.inst`.
620
621 If you want to use a data type with a template parameter for which there is
622 an explicit instantiation, you only need to include the respective `.h`
623 header file, e.g. `sparse_matrix.h`. If, however, you want to use a
624 template parameter for which there is no explicit instantiation in the
625 corresponding `.cc` file, you have to include the respective `.templates.h`
626 file in order for your program to link successfully.
627
628 The reason for all of this is essentially a matter of reducing compilation
629 time. As long as you use data types with template parameters for which
630 there is an explicit instantiation - and this should be the case most of
631 the time - you do not need to compile the respective (lengthy) .templates.h
632 file every time you compile your code. If, however, you need to use an
633 instance of e.g. `SparseMatrix<bool>`, you have to include the respective
634 `.templates.h` file and you have to compile it along with the remaining
635 files of your program every time.
636
637 ### When trying to run my program on Mac OS X, I get image errors.
638
639 You may encounter an error of the form
640
641 ```
642 dyld: Library not loaded: libdeal_II.g.7.0.0.dylib. Reason: image not found
643 ```
644
645 on OS X. This goes hand in hand with the following message you should have
646 gotten at the end of the output of `./configure`:
647
648 ```
649      Please add the line
650         export DYLD_LIBRARY_PATH=\$DYLD_LIBRARY_PATH:$DEAL2_DIR/lib
651      to your .bash_profile file so that OSX will be
652      able to find the deal.II shared libraries when
653      executing your programs.
654 ```
655
656 What happens is this: when you say "make all", all the deal.II files are
657 compiled and linked into a library (called libdeal_II.g.7.0.0) which on Macs
658 have the file ending .dylib. Then you go to examples/step-1 and compile your
659 program, which uses all the functions and classes that have previously been
660 put into this library.
661
662 Now the following happens: On most operating systems, the actual executable
663 program (i.e. the file step-1 in your directory that resulted from compiling)
664 does not contain any information that would indicate where the various
665 libraries that it uses can be found. For example, the step-1 program does not
666 know where the libdeal_II.g.7.0.0.dylib file is. This is just how most
667 operating systems function. But when you want to execute the program, somehow
668 the program has to know where the library it needs is located. On most
669 unix-like operating systems, this is done by setting an "environment
670 variable" -- on linux this would the variable "LD_LIBRARY_PATH", on Mac OS X
671 it is "DYLD_LIBRARY_PATH".
672
673 So to let the operating system know where the library is located, you could
674 type
675   export DYLD_LIBRARY_PATH=$DYLD_LIBRARY_PATH:/Users/renjun/deal.ii/lib
676 every time before you want to execute the program. That would be cumbersome. A
677 simpler way would be if this export command is executed every time when you
678 open a new shell window. This can be achieved by putting this command in a
679 file that is executed every time you open a shell window. Depending on what
680 shell you use, these files are alternatively called
681   .cshrc
682   .bashrc
683   .bash_profile
684 or similar. I'm not quite sure which file is relevant for you, but you can try
685 them one after the other by putting the text in there, closing the window,
686 opening it again, and then trying to execute
687   ./step-1
688 (or saying "make run" in this directory) and seeing whether that works.
689
690 ## C++ questions
691
692 ### What integrated development environment (IDE) works well with deal.II?
693
694 The short answer is probably: whatever works best for you. deal.II uses the
695 build tool CMake, which can generate a project description for virtually every
696 IDE. In the past, many of the main developers have used emacs (or even vi), but
697 there are much better tools around today, such as [eclipse](http://www.eclipse.org/),
698 [KDevelop](http://www.kdevelop.org),
699 [Xcode](http://developer.apple.com/technologies/tools/),
700 [QtCreator](http://qt.nokia.com/products/developer-tools/), all of which
701 have been used by people using deal.II.
702
703 We have gathered some notes on using the following IDEs for deal.II:
704   - [[Eclipse]]
705   - [[KDevelop]]
706   - [[emacs]]: While we don't recommend using emacs any more, this link provides a couple of notes on formatting styles used within deal.II.
707
708 When thinking about what IDE to use, keep this in mind: Many of us have
709 used emacs (or, worse, vi) for years and feel very comfortable with it.
710 But, emacs and vi were both started in 1976, at a time when computers had
711 little memory, virtually no CPU power, and only text-based interfaces.
712 While they have of course become a lot better over time, the design
713 limitations this involved are still very much part of the code base:
714 fundamentally, they are both still text-based and file-oriented. What IDEs
715 can provide are multiple views of the same project in graphical and textual
716 form and, more importantly, can integrate entire projects spanning hundreds
717 of files in multiple directories: they know where a variable is declared
718 (even if it's in a different file), what it's type is, and the properties
719 of this type. Neither emacs nor vi nor any other older editor can provide
720 anything that comes even close to what kdevelop or eclipse can offer in
721 this regard.
722
723 What all this implies is that you should consider using one of the more
724 modern tools, even if you're well acquainted with an existing, older one.
725 Of course it takes a while to get used to a new application but my
726 (Wolfgang's) experience with switching from emacs to kdevelop was that I
727 have become '''so''' much more productive by using modern tools that the
728 time invested in learning it was amortized very quickly. I found this
729 experience a real eye-opener!
730
731 ### Is there a good introduction to C++?
732
733 There are of course many good books and online resources that explain C++.
734 As far as websites are concerned,
735 [www.cplusplus.com](http://www.cplusplus.com) has both [reference material
736 for individual classes of the C++ standard
737 library](http://cplusplus.com/reference/) as well as a [a tutorial on parts
738 of the C++ language](http://cplusplus.com/tutorial) if you want to brush up
739 on the correct syntax of things.
740
741 ### Are there features of C++ that you avoid in deal.II?
742
743 There are few things that we avoid <i>as a matter of principle.</i> C++ is,
744 by and large, a pretty well designed language in the sense that its
745 features are there because they have been found to be useful by a lot of
746 people. As an example, people have found that it is easier to write and
747 debug code that throws exceptions in error cases rather than encoding error
748 situations by special return values (e.g. by returning -1). There are of
749 course ways to avoid exceptions (or templates, or certain parts of the C++
750 standard libraries, or any number of other things people have found
751 objectionable in C++) and some software projects have chosen to restrict
752 the use of C++ (for example Mozilla) or to emulate only those parts of C++
753 they like in C (e.g. the GNOME desktop environment, which leads to awkward
754 to understand code
755 [as described here](http://developer.gnome.org/gobject/stable/howto-gobject-methods.html)).
756
757 But ultimately, it is our belief that these approaches shoot their
758 inventors in the foot: they avoid features of C++ that were really intended
759 to make programming life simpler. It may be simpler for novice programmers
760 to read code without templates; ultimately, however, learning to read and
761 use templates will make you a much more productive programmer since you
762 don't write the same code multiple times. As a consequence, the use of C++
763 is driven by the question of what is best suited to write a particular
764 algorithm, not by abstract considerations. This fits into the realization
765 that deal.II is a large piece of software -- not a small research project
766 -- that requires professional software management practices and for which
767 long term development can no longer be driven by an individual programmer's
768 preferences of style.
769
770 ### Why use templates for the space dimension?
771
772 The fundamental motivation for this is to use dimension-independent
773 programming, i.e. you want to write code in such a way that it looks
774 exactly the same in 2d as in 3d (or 1d, for that matter). There are of
775 course many ways to do this (and libraries have done this for a long time
776 before deal.II has). The three most popular ones are to use a preprocessor
777 `#define` that sets the space dimension globally, to use a global variable
778 that does this, and to have each object have a member variable that denotes
779 the space dimension it is supposed to live in (in much the same way as the
780 template argument does in deal.II). Neither of these approaches is optimal
781 (nor is our own approach to use templates), however. In particular, using a
782 preprocessor symbol or a global variable will not allow you to mix and
783 match objects of different dimensionality. There are situations when you
784 want to do that; for example deal.II internally builds higher dimensional
785 quadrature formulas as tensor products of lower dimensional ones, and in
786 application codes you may wish to discretize both volume models (e.g.
787 simulating 3d models of plate tectonics and mountain belt formation) with
788 surface models (e.g. erosion processes on the 2d earth surface).
789
790 This leaves the option to have a member variable denoting the space
791 dimension in each object, a choice most other finite element libraries have
792 followed. But this isn't optimal either, for two reasons. For example,
793 consider this code that describes the equivalent of the `Point<dim>` class
794 for points in dim-dimensional space and its `norm()` member function:
795
796 ```cpp
797 class Point
798 {
799 public:
800   Point (const unsigned int dimension)
801     : dim(dimension),
802       coordinates (new double[dim])
803   {}
804
805   ~Point() { delete[] coordinates; }
806
807   double norm () const;
808   ...
809 private:
810   unsigned int dim;
811   double *coordinates;
812 };
813
814 double Point::norm () const
815 {
816   double s = 0;
817   for (unsigned int d=0; d<dim; ++d)
818     s += coordinates[d] * coordinates[d];
819   return std::sqrt(s);
820 }
821 ```
822
823 This is going to lead to rather slow code, for multiple reasons:
824
825  - The constructor and destructor have to allocate and deallocate memory on
826    the heap, both expensive processes.
827
828  - When accessing any element of the `coordinates` array, two pointers have
829    to be dereferenced. For example, the access to `coordinates[d]` really
830    expands to `*(this->coordinates + d)`.
831
832  - The compiler can not optimize the loop since the upper bound `dim` of
833    the loop variable is unknown at compile time.
834
835
836 Compare this to the way deal.II (approximately) implements this class:
837
838 ```cpp
839   template <int dim>
840   class Point
841   {
842     public:
843       Point () {}
844       ~Point() {}
845
846       double norm () const;
847       ...
848     private:
849       double coordinates[dim];
850   };
851
852   template <int dim>
853   double Point<dim>::norm () const
854   {
855     double s = 0;
856     for (unsigned int d=0; d<dim; ++d)
857       s += coordinates[d] * coordinates[d];
858     return std::sqrt(s);
859   }
860 ```
861
862 Here, the following holds:
863
864  - Constructor and destructor do not have to allocate and deallocate memory
865    on the heap; rather, since the size of the `coordinates` array is known
866    at compile time (i.e. whenever you instantiate the template for a
867    particular dimension), the array lives on the stack. It is also much
868    smaller than before: the dimension is encoded in the type and doesn't
869    need a memory location, we don't need to store a pointer to an array,
870    and we don't incur the memory overhead of having to manage an object on
871    the heap.
872
873  - When accessing any element of the `coordinates` array, only one pointer
874    has to be dereferenced. For example, the access to `coordinates` really
875    expands to `*(this + d)`.
876
877  - The compiler can optimize the loop since the upper bound `dim` of the
878    loop variable is known at compile time. In particular, for a point in
879    2d, the code the compiler will produce is likely to look more like this
880    because the loop can be unrolled and the loop counter can be optimized
881    away:
882 ```cpp
883 double Point<2>::norm () const
884 {
885   return std::sqrt(coordinates[0] * coordinates[0] + coordinates[1] * coordinates[1]);
886 }
887 ```
888 Obviously, for a 3d point, the code will look differently, but the compiler
889 can do this since it knows what the dimension of the point is at compile
890 time.
891
892 There is another reason for the deal.II way: type safety. In short, a 2d
893 point is not the same as a 3d point. If you assign one to the other, then
894 this may be on purpose and the executable should simply change the value of
895 the `dim` member variable from 2 to 3. But it may also be a legitimate
896 error -- for example, you shouldn't be able to use 2d points to initialize
897 the 3d quadrature points needed to integrate on a 3d cell. This can of
898 course be caught by run-time checks, but the reason for strongly typed
899 languages such as C++ has always been that it is much more efficient if the
900 compiler can already catch this sort of error at compile time. Using
901 templates for the space dimension avoids these sort of mistakes up front by
902 forcing the programmer to explicitly specify her intent, rather than
903 encoding intent in assertions.
904
905 Of course there are also downsides to using templates. Most notably, error
906 messages that involve templates are notoriously unreadable, and that
907 compiling template heavy code is slow: for example, we have to compile the
908 `Point` class three times (for dim=1, dim=2 and dim=3) rather than only
909 once. Nevertheless, we believe that these valid objections do not outweigh
910 the benefits of templates.
911
912 ### Doesn't it take forever to compile templates?
913
914 Yes, in general it does. The reason is that while for non-templates it is
915 enough to put the ''declaration'' of a function into the header file and
916 the ''definition'' into the `.cc` file, for templates that doesn't work.
917 Let's say you have something like
918 ```cpp
919   template <typename T> T square (const T & t);
920 ```
921
922 in your header file and you put the definition
923 ```cpp
924   template <typename T> T square (const T & t) { return t*t; }
925 ```
926
927 into the `.cc` file, then the compiler will say "Yes, I saw this template,
928 and if I see a use of this function later on I will generate a function
929 from it by replacing `T` by whatever type you use in the call". But if
930 there is no call later on in the same `.cc` file, then the compiler won't
931 do anything. If, at the same time, in a different `.cc` file that includes
932 the header file, you use the function with `T=double` the compiler will say
933 "Yes, I saw the declaration, but there is no definition; I assume the
934 function has been compiled in a different `.cc` file with `T=double` and
935 I'll simply record a call to this instantiation in the object file". The
936 call will then be resolved at link time if indeed another object file
937 contains an instantiation of the template for `T=double`. However, if no
938 other object file contains such a definition, a linker error will result.
939
940 In general, for functions like the above, it is difficult to foresee what
941 kinds of template arguments the function may be instantiated for, and so
942 there is no real practical way to put the definition into a `.cc` file.
943 Rather, one puts it into a header file, and so all `.cc` files that may use
944 this function see its definition (i.e. its body) and the compiler can
945 instantiate it in each source file for whatever template argument is
946 necessary. This makes sure that you never get linker errors, but at the
947 same time it makes compiling slow since every header file now not only has
948 to parse the function's declaration, but also its definition -- and in the
949 case of deal.II the definitions of all template functions add up to tens or
950 hundreds of thousands of lines of code. This is one of the reason why many
951 C++ programs compile relatively slowly: because they use a significant part
952 of the C++ standard library, most of which consists of templates.
953
954 deal.II can avoid much of this overhead. The trick is to recognize that in
955 the example above we don't really know what types `T` user code may
956 possibly want to use for this template. But in the case of using the space
957 dimension as a template parameter, we know pretty exactly all the possibly
958 values: `Triangulation<dim>` may really only be instantiated for `dim=1, 2,
959 3` and for nothing else. Consequently, we can do the following: Put all the
960 definitions of the member functions of deal.II into the `.cc` file and at
961 the bottom of the file instruct the compiler to please instantiate all of
962 these templates for `dim=1, 2, 3`. Similar things can be done for many
963 other template functions in deal.II; for example, there are a good number
964 of functions that require vector types as template arguments, of which
965 deal.II provides a good number, yet this list is finite and enumerable.
966 Consequently, we can simply, at the bottom of the `.cc` file, tell the
967 compiler to instantiate all of these template functions for every single
968 vector type deal.II supports, and then don't have to put thousands of lines
969 of template definitions into header files.
970
971 In many cases, enumerating all possible template arguments is tedious; it
972 is also difficult to extend this list when a new vector type is added, for
973 example. To simplify this task, deal.II uses a preprocessor: for many files
974 that want to instantiate a function or class for multiple template
975 arguments, we have a file `.inst.in` that has the equivalent of a
976 `for`-loop over all possible values or types for a template argument; the
977 file is processed by the `common/scripts/expand_instantiations` program to
978 produce a `.inst` file that can then be included into the `.cc` file.
979
980 ### Why do I need to use `typename` in all these templates?
981
982 This is indeed a frequent question. To answer it, it is necessary to
983 understand how a compiler deals with templates, which will take a bit of
984 space here. Let's take for example this case:
985
986 ```cpp
987   void f(int);
988   void g(double d)
989   {
990     f(d);
991   }
992   void f(double);
993 ```
994
995 Here, in the function `void g(double)`, we call `f` with a double as an
996 argument. Because at that point the compiler has only seen the declaration
997 of the first overload of `f`, it will convert the double `d` to an integer
998 and call this first overload. The fact that a second overload was declared
999 later does not change this situation, since it wasn't visible at the time
1000 the compiler parsed `g`.
1001
1002 Templates are designed to work essentially the same, but there are slight
1003 complications. Take this example:
1004
1005 ```cpp
1006   void f(int);
1007   void f(char);
1008   template <typename T> void g(T t)
1009   {
1010     f(1.1);
1011     f(t);
1012   }
1013   void f(double);
1014 ```
1015
1016 In the first line of `g`, the same thing happens as before: the argument is
1017 cast to `int` and the first of the two overloads of `f` is called. But when
1018 the compiler sees the template, it doesn't know yet what type `T` actually
1019 represents, so there is no way to settle on one of the two functions `f`
1020 the compiler has seen before when deciding about the second line. In fact,
1021 the C++ standard says that because the type of the argument `t` in the call
1022 depends on the template type, determining what function to actually call
1023 should only happen <i>at the time and place when the template is
1024 instantiated</i> (this is called <i>argument dependent name lookup</i> or
1025 <i>ADL</i>). In other words, if below the code above we had this:
1026 ```cpp
1027   void h()
1028   {
1029     g(1.1);
1030   }
1031 ```
1032
1033 then in the instantiation of `g` the first call would be to `f(int)`
1034 (because the argument 1.1 does not depend on the type given in the template
1035 argument, and consequently only functions are considered that were seen
1036 <i>before the definition of</i> `g(T)`) whereas the second call to `f`
1037 would be to `f(double)` -- even though `f(double)` wasn't even declared at
1038 the place the compiler saw the call in the template (though it is available
1039 at the place where we instantiate `g<double>`) -- because the function call
1040 argument `t` has type `T` and therefore depends on the template argument.
1041
1042 Argument dependent lookup allows you to use function templates like `g`
1043 with your own data types. For example, you could have your own library that
1044 does
1045 ```cpp
1046   #include <f.h>
1047
1048   struct X { /* something */ };
1049
1050   void f (const X & x) { /* do something with the X */ }
1051
1052   void my_function()
1053   {
1054     X x;
1055     g(x);
1056   }
1057 ```
1058
1059 Presumably the writer of the `g` function did not know about your own type
1060 `X` yet, but her code still works because you provided a suitable overload
1061 of `f` in your own code.
1062
1063 So ADL is clever and allows you to use templates in ways the author of the
1064 template did not anticipate. But it has a dark side: for every statement in
1065 your code, the compiler has to figure out whether it depends on the
1066 template types or not, and it needs in fact to know quite a lot about it.
1067 Take this example:
1068
1069 ```cpp
1070   int p;
1071   template <typename T>
1072   void g(T t)
1073   {
1074     T::something * p;
1075     f(p);
1076   }
1077 ```
1078
1079 Here, is the call to `f` dependent because `p` depends on the type `T`? If
1080 `f` is called with an argument of type `X` that is declared like this
1081
1082 ```cpp
1083   struct X
1084   {
1085     typedef int something;
1086   };
1087 ```
1088
1089 then `T::something * p;` would declare a local variable called `p` that is
1090 of type pointer-to-int. On the other hand, if we had
1091
1092 ```cpp
1093   struct X
1094   {
1095     static double something;
1096   };
1097 ```
1098
1099 then `T::something * p;` multiplies the variable `X::something` by the
1100 global variable `p` and ignores the result of the multiplication. The
1101 following call to `f` would then be non-dependent because the type of the
1102 (global) variable `p` does not depend on the template argument.
1103
1104 The example shows that the compiler can't know whether a call is dependent
1105 or not in a template it is just seeing unless we tell it that
1106 `T::something` is supposed to be a type or a variable or function name. To
1107 avoid this situation, C++ says: if a compiler sees `T::something` then this
1108 is a variable or function name unless it is prefixed by the keyword
1109 `typename` in which case it is supposed to be a type. In other words, the
1110 call to `f` here is going to be non-dependent:
1111 ```cpp
1112   int p;
1113   template <typename T>
1114   void g(T t)
1115   {
1116     T::something * p;
1117     f(p);
1118   }
1119 ```
1120
1121 and instantiating `g` with the first example for `X` is going to lead to
1122 errors because `T::something` didn't turn out to be a variable. On the
1123 other hand, if we had
1124 ```cpp
1125   int p;
1126   template <typename T>
1127   void g(T t)
1128   {
1129     typename T::something * p;
1130     f(p);
1131   }
1132 ```
1133
1134 then the call is dependent and will be deferred until the compiler knows
1135 the type of `T`.
1136
1137 ### Why do I need to use `this->` in all these templates?
1138
1139 This is a consequence of the same rule in the C++ standard as discussed in
1140 the previous question, Argument Dependent Lookup of names (ADL). Consider
1141 this piece of code:
1142 ```cpp
1143   template <typename T>
1144   class Base
1145   {
1146   public:
1147     void f();
1148   };
1149
1150   template <typename T>
1151   class Derived : public Base<T>
1152   {
1153   public:
1154     void g();
1155   };
1156
1157   template <typename T>
1158   void Derived<T>::g()
1159   {
1160     f();
1161   }
1162 ```
1163
1164 By the rules, when the compiler <i>parses</i> the function `Derived::g`
1165 (note that parsing happens before and independently of <i>instantiating</i>
1166 the function for a particular argument type `T`), it sees that the call to
1167 `f()` does not depend on the template type and so it looks for a
1168 declaration of such a function somewhere. In the example above, it doesn't
1169 find one (we'll come to this in a second), which will yield an error. On
1170 the other hand, in this code,
1171 ```cpp
1172   void f(); // global function
1173
1174   template <typename T>
1175   class Base
1176   {
1177   public:
1178     void f();
1179   };
1180
1181   template <typename T>
1182   class Derived : public Base<T>
1183   {
1184   public:
1185     void g();
1186   };
1187
1188   template <typename T>
1189   void Derived<T>::g()
1190   {
1191     f();
1192   }
1193 ```
1194
1195 it would find the global function and so when instantiating the function
1196 for, say, `T=int`, you'd get a function `Derived<int>::g` that would call
1197 the global function `::f`. This may or may not be what you had in mind.
1198
1199 The question of course is why the compiler didn't record a call to
1200 `Base<T>::f` in `Derived<int>::g`? After all, the compiler knows that
1201 `Derived` is derived from `Base`. This has a lot to do with the fact that
1202 at the time of <i>parsing</i> the template, the compiler doesn't know for
1203 which template arguments the template will later be instantiated, and with
1204 explicit or partial specializations.  Consider for example this code:
1205 ```cpp
1206   template <typename T>
1207   class Base
1208   {
1209   public:
1210     void f();
1211   };
1212
1213   class X
1214   {
1215   public:
1216     void f();
1217   };
1218
1219   template <> class Base<int> : public X {};
1220
1221   template <typename T>
1222   class Derived : public Base<T>
1223   {
1224   public:
1225     void g();
1226   };
1227
1228   template <typename T>
1229   void Derived<T>::g()
1230   {
1231     f();
1232   }
1233 ```
1234
1235 Here, if you look at `Derived<T>::g`, the call to `f()` will be resolved to
1236 `Base<T>::f` for all possible types `T`, unless `T=int` in which case the
1237 call will be to `X::f`. The point is that at the time the compiler sees
1238 (parses) the template, it simply doesn't know yet what `T` is, and so ADL
1239 says: if the call is not dependent, find a non-dependent function to record
1240 (e.g. a global function) rather than trying to find a call in scopes you
1241 can't yet know will be relevant (e.g. `Base` or `X`). Likewise, in this
1242 code,
1243 ```cpp
1244   template <typename T>
1245   class Base
1246   {
1247   public:
1248     void f();
1249   };
1250
1251   template <>
1252   class Base<int>
1253   {
1254   public:
1255     struct f {};
1256   };
1257
1258   template <typename T>
1259   class Derived : public Base<T>
1260   {
1261   public:
1262     void g();
1263   };
1264
1265   template <typename T>
1266   void Derived<T>::g()
1267   {
1268     f();
1269   }
1270 ```
1271
1272 the meaning of `f()` changes depending on the template type: if `T=int`, it
1273 creates an object of type `Base<int>>::f` and then throws the object away
1274 again immediately. For all other template arguments `T`, it calls
1275 `Base::f`.
1276
1277 Given this longish description of how compilers look up names under the ADL
1278 rule, let's get back to the original question: If you have this code,
1279 ```cpp
1280   template <typename T>
1281   class Base
1282   {
1283   public:
1284     void f();
1285   };
1286
1287   template <typename T>
1288   class Derived : public Base<T>
1289   {
1290   public:
1291     void g();
1292   };
1293
1294   template <typename T> void Derived<T>::g()
1295   {
1296     f();
1297   }
1298 ```
1299
1300 how do you achieve that the call in `Derived::g` goes to `Base::f`? The
1301 answer is: Tell the compiler to defer the decision of what the call is
1302 supposed to do till the time when it knows what `T` actually is. And we've
1303 already seen how to do that: we need to make the call <i>dependent</i> on
1304 `T`! The way to do that is this:
1305 ```cpp
1306   template <typename T>
1307   void Derived<T>::g()
1308   {
1309     this->f();
1310   }
1311 ```
1312
1313 Here, `this` is a pointer to an object of type `Derived<T>`, which is of
1314 course dependent. So the resolution of what the statement is supposed to
1315 represent is deferred until instantiation time; at that time, however, the
1316 compiler knows what the base class is (for example it knows if there are
1317 explicit specializations) and so it knows which base classes to look into
1318 in an attempt to find a function with the name `f`.
1319
1320 ### Does deal.II require C++11 support?
1321 The answer to this question depends on the version of deal.II that you are
1322 interested in using
1323
1324 #### deal.II version 9.0.0
1325 As of version 9.0.0, deal.II requires C++11 support equivalent to that provided
1326 by GCC 4.8.0., which is, essentially, every new feature in C++11.
1327
1328 #### deal.II version 8.5.0 and previous
1329 The current release of deal.II, 8.5.0, is compatible with the C++98 and C++03
1330 standards, but some features (e.g., the `LinearOperator` class) are only
1331 available if your compiler supports a subset of C++11 features. GCC 4.6 and
1332 newer implement enough of C++11 for these features to be turned on. More
1333 exactly, we currently require the following language features to be present:
1334
1335 1. `auto`-typed variables
1336 2. The `nullptr` keyword
1337 3. Move constructors
1338 4. The `declval` and `decltype` keywords
1339 5. Lambda functions
1340
1341 while we do not use the following features:
1342
1343 1. Marking virtual functions as `override`
1344 2. Some features of the `type_traits` header, such as `std::is_trivially_copyable`
1345 3. Inheriting constructors
1346 4. Template aliases
1347
1348 The deal.II documentation has a
1349 [page](http://dealii.org/8.5.0/doxygen/deal.II/group__CPP11.html) dedicated to
1350 the issue of what parts of C++11 we use and how this works. For a more complete
1351 list of features we do and do not use see
1352 [the GCC 4.6 C++11 compatibility page](https://gcc.gnu.org/gcc-4.6/cxx0x_status.html).
1353
1354 ### Can I convert Triangulation cell iterators to DoFHandler cell iterators?
1355
1356 Yes. You can also convert between iterators belonging to different
1357 DoFHandlers as long as the are based on the identical Triangulation:
1358
1359 ```cpp
1360 Triangulation<2>::active_cell_iterator it = triangulation.begin_active();
1361
1362 DoFHandler<2>::active_cell_iterator it2 (&triangulation, it->level(), it->index(), &dof_handler);
1363 ```
1364
1365 ## Questions about specific behavior of parts of deal.II
1366
1367 ### How do I create the mesh for my problem?
1368
1369 Before answering the immediate question, one remark: When you use adaptive
1370 mesh refinement, you definitely want the initial mesh to be as coarse as
1371 possible. The reason is that you can make it as fine as you want using
1372 adaptive refinement as long as you have memory and CPU time available.
1373 However, this requires that you don't waste mesh cells in parts of the
1374 domain where they don't pay off. As a consequence, you don't want to start
1375 with a mesh that is too fine to start with, because that takes up a good
1376 part of your cell budget already, and because you can't coarsen away cells
1377 that are in the initial mesh.
1378
1379 That said, there are essentially three ways to generate a mesh, all of
1380 which are discussed in significantly more detail in the step-49 tutorial
1381 program:
1382  - For many standard geometries (square, cube, circle, sphere, ...) there
1383    are functions in namespace `GridGenerator` that can generate coarse
1384    meshes.
1385  - If `GridGenerator` does not offer a mesh for the geometry you have, but
1386    if the geometry is simple, then you can often create one "by hand". Take
1387    a look, for example, at how we create the mesh in step-14 using the
1388    `Triangulation::create_triangulation` function. All you need to do is
1389    take a piece of paper, draw the geometry and a number of coarse cells
1390    that form quadrilaterals, identify the locations of vertices and the
1391    connectivity from cells to vertices, and pass the corresponding lists to
1392    the Triangulation. Something similar can be done for simple 3d
1393    geometries.
1394  - If your geometry is truly complicated enough so that you can't draw a
1395    mesh by hand any more (i.e. if it requires more than, for example, 20-30
1396    coarse mesh cells), then you'll need a mesh generator. For
1397    quadrilaterals and hexahedra, there aren't all that many mesh
1398    generators. [gmsh](http://www.gmsh.info),
1399    [lagrit](https://lagrit.lanl.gov/) and [cubit](http://cubit.sandia.gov/)
1400    come to mind. The primary problem is that most mesh generators' output
1401    meshes aren't particularly coarse by default, so you may want to pay
1402    particular attention to this point when running the mesh generator.
1403    (This is relevant since deal.II is particularly good about creating
1404    adaptively refined meshes, but if your coarse mesh is already very large
1405    then you will likely not have a lot of resources left to adaptively
1406    refine it some more.) Once you have a mesh from a mesh generator, you
1407    would read it using the `GridIn` class, as demonstrated, for example, in
1408    step-5.
1409  - As it was already mentioned, if you do need to work with a geometry for which all you have is a triangular or tetrahedral mesh, then you can convert this mesh into one that consists of quadrilaterals and hexahedra using the tethex program, see https://github.com/martemyev/tethex .
1410
1411 ### How do I describe complex boundaries?
1412
1413 You need to define classes derived from the `Boundary` base class and
1414 attach these to particular parts of the boundary of the triangulation. The
1415 `Triangulation` class will then query your boundary object whenever it
1416 needs a new point on the boundary after mesh refinement.
1417
1418 In deal.II releases after 8.1, the way geometry is described has been made
1419 much more flexible. In particular, it is no longer only possible to
1420 describe the boundary, but it is also possible to describe where points in
1421 the interior lie. The step-53 tutorial program explains how this is done
1422 for a realistic example.
1423
1424
1425 ### I am using discontinuous Lagrange elements (`FE_DGQ`) but they don't seem to have vertex degrees of freedom!?
1426
1427 Indeed. And here's the reason: a vertex is an entity that is shared between
1428 different cells, i.e. it doesn't belong to one cell or another. If you have
1429 a shape function that is associated with it, then its support will extend
1430 to all of the cells that are adjacent to the vertex since no cell is
1431 different than any other cell. This is what happens, for example, with the
1432 `FE_Q(1)` element. The same is true, by the way, for degrees of freedom
1433 (and associated shape functions) that correspond to edges and faces between
1434 cells.
1435
1436 But that doesn't answer the question of discontinuous elements. There, you
1437 have functions that are interpolation polynomials whose <i>support
1438 point</i> happens to be located at the same position as the vertex, but the
1439 actual support of the shape function is restricted to a single cell. In
1440 other words, '''logically''' these shape functions belong to a cell, not a
1441 vertex or edge or face, since the latter are all shared between adjacent
1442 cells. What this leads to is that, for example for the `FE_DGQ(1)` element,
1443 you have
1444  - `fe.dofs_per_vertex` is zero
1445  - `fe.dofs_per_line` is zero
1446  - `fe.dofs_per_face` is zero
1447  - `fe.dofs_per_cell` is 4 in 2d and 8 in 3d.
1448 In other words, all shape functions are associated with the cell interior.
1449
1450 If this answer isn't quite satisfactory (because, after all, the shape
1451 functions <i>are</i> defined by interpolation at the location of the
1452 vertices), one could turn the question around: If you ask me for the degree
1453 of freedom associated with vertex 13, then I should ask you in return
1454 <i>which one</i> you have in mind since if there, say, four cells that meet
1455 at this vertex, then there will be 4 degrees of freedom defined there.
1456 Likewise, if you ask me for the value of the degree of freedom associated
1457 with vertex 13, then I should ask you in return <i>which one</i> as the
1458 function is discontinuous there and will have multiple values at the
1459 location of the vertex.
1460
1461 ### How do I access values of discontinuous elements at vertices?
1462
1463 The previous question answered why DG elements aren't defined at the
1464 vertices of the mesh. Consequently, functions like `cell->vertex_dof_index`
1465 aren't going to provide anything useful. Nevertheless, there are occasions
1466 where one would like to recover values of a discontinuous field at the
1467 location of the vertices, for example to average the values one gets from
1468 all adjacent cells in recovery estimators.
1469
1470 So how does one do that? The answer is: Getting the values at the vertices
1471 of a cell works just like getting the values at any other point of a cell.
1472 You have to set up a quadrature formula that has quadrature points at the
1473 vertices and then use an FEValues object with it. If you then use
1474 FEValues::get_function_values, you will get the values at all quadrature
1475 points (i.e. vertices) at once.
1476
1477 Setting up this quadrature formula can be done in two different ways: (i)
1478 You can create an object of type `Quadrature` from a vector of points that
1479 you can initialize with the reference coordinates of the 2<sup>dim</sup>
1480 vertices of a cell; or (ii) you can use the `QTrapez` class that has its
1481 quadrature points in the vertices. In the latter case, however, you need to
1482 verify that the order of quadrature points is indeed the same order as the
1483 vertices of a cell and, if that is not the case, translate between the two
1484 numbering systems.
1485
1486 ### Does deal.II support anisotropic finite element shape functions?
1487
1488 There is currently no easy-to-use support for this. It's not going to work
1489 for continuous elements because we assume that `fe.dofs_per_face` is the
1490 same for all faces of a cell.
1491
1492 It may be possible to make this work for discontinuous elements, though.
1493 What you would have to do is define a bunch of different elements with
1494 anisotropic shape functions and select which element to use on which cells,
1495 using the `hp::DoFHandler` to deal with using different elements on
1496 different cells. The part that's missing is to implement elements with
1497 anisotropic shape functions. I imagine that this wouldn't be too
1498 complicated to do since the element is discontinuous, but someone would
1499 have to implement it.
1500
1501 That said, you can do anisotropic <i>refinement</i>, which of course also
1502 introduces a kind of anisotropic approximation of your finite element
1503 space.
1504
1505 ### The graphical output files don't make sense to me -- they seem to have too many degrees of freedom!
1506
1507 Let's assume you have a 2x2 mesh and a Q<sub>1</sub> element then you would
1508 assume that output files (e.g. in VTK format) just have 9 vertex locations
1509 and 9 values, one for each of the 9 nodes of the mesh. However, the file
1510 actually shows 16 vertices and 16 such values.
1511
1512 The reason is that frequently output quantities in deal.II are
1513 discontinuous: it may be that the finite element in use is discontinuous to
1514 begin with; or that the quantity we want to output is defined on a
1515 cell-by-cell basis (e.g. error indicators) and therefore discontinuous; or
1516 that it is a quantity computed from a DataPostprocessor object that could
1517 be discontinuous. In order to not make things more complicated than
1518 necessary, deal.II <i>always</i> assumes that quantities are discontinuous,
1519 even if some of them may in fact be continuous. The problem is that all
1520 graphical formats want to see one value for each output field per vertex.
1521 But discontinuous fields have more than one value at the location of a
1522 vertex of the mesh. The solution to the problem is then to simply output
1523 each vertex multiple times -- with different vertex numbers but at exactly
1524 the same location, once for each cell it is adjacent to. In other words, in
1525 2d, each cell has four unique vertices. The 2x2 mesh in the example
1526 therefore has 16 vertices (4 vertices for each of the 4 cells) and we
1527 output 16 values. Several of these vertices will have the same location and
1528 if the field is indeed continuous, several of the values will also be the
1529 same.
1530
1531 ### In my graphical output, the solution appears discontinuous at hanging nodes
1532
1533 Let me guess -- you are using higher order elements? If that's the
1534 case, then the solution only looks discontinuous but isn't
1535 really. What's happening is that the solution is, in fact, a higher
1536 order polynomial (e.g., a quadratic polynomial) along each edge of a
1537 cell but because all visualization file formats only support writing
1538 data as bilinear elements we need to write data in a way that shows
1539 only a linear interpolation of this higher order polynomial along each
1540 edge. This is no problem if the two neighboring elements share the
1541 entire edge because then the linear interpolations from both sides
1542 coincide. However, if we have a hanging node, then the value at the
1543 hanging node appears to float above or below the linear interpolation
1544 from the longer side, like here (in the left picture, see the gap at
1545 the bottom in the blue green area, and around the top left in the
1546 greenish area; pictures by Kevin Dugan):
1547
1548 <img width="400px" src="http://www.dealii.org/images/wiki/gap-in-q2-1.png" align="center" />
1549 <img width="400px" src="http://www.dealii.org/images/wiki/gap-in-q2-2.png" align="center" />
1550
1551 From this description you can already guess what the solution is: the
1552 solution is internally in fact continuous: even though we only show a
1553 linear interpolation on the long edge, the true solution actually goes
1554 through the "floating" node. All this is, consequently, just an
1555 artifact of the way visualization programs show data.
1556
1557 If this bothers you or it simply looks bad in your graphics, you can
1558 lessen the problem by not plotting just a linear interpolation on each
1559 cell but outputting the solution as a linear interpolation on a larger
1560 number of "patches" per cell (e.g., plotting 5x5 patches per
1561 cell). This can be done by using the `DataOut::build_patches` function
1562 with an argument larger than one -- see its documentation.
1563
1564 This all said, if you are in fact using a Q1 element and you see such
1565 gaps in the solution, then something is genuinely wrong. One
1566 possibility is that you forget to call `ConstraintMatrix::distribute`
1567 after solving the linear system, or you do not set up these
1568 constraints correctly. In either case, it's a bug if this happens with
1569 Q1 elements.
1570
1571 ### When I run the tutorial programs, I get slightly different results
1572
1573 This is sometimes unavoidable. deal.II uses a number of iterative
1574 algorithms (e.g. in solving linear systems, but the adaptive mesh
1575 refinement loop is also an iteration if you think about it) where certain
1576 criteria are specified by comparing floating point numbers. For example,
1577 the CG method terminates the iteration whenever the residual drops below a
1578 certain threshold; similarly, we refine as many cells as are necessary to
1579 take care of a fraction of the total error. In both cases, the quantities
1580 that are compared are floating point numbers which are subject to floating
1581 point round off. The problem is that floating point round off depends on
1582 the processor (sometimes), compiler flags or randomness (if parallelization
1583 is involved) and consequently an a solver may terminate one iteration
1584 earlier or later, depending on your environment, than the one from which we
1585 produced our results. With a different solution typically come different
1586 refinement indicators and different meshes downstream.
1587
1588 In other words, this is something that simply happens. What should worry
1589 you, however, is if you run the same program twice and you get slightly
1590 different output. This hints at non-deterministic effects that one should
1591 investigate.
1592
1593 ### How do I access the whole vector in a parallel MPI computation?
1594
1595 Note that this causes a bottleneck for large scale computations and you
1596 should try to use a parallel vector with ghost entries instead. If you
1597 really need to do this, create a TrilinosWrappers::Vector (or a
1598 PETScWrappers::Vector) and assign your parallel vector to it (or use a copy
1599 constructor). You can find this being done in step-17 if you search for
1600 "localized_solution".
1601
1602 ### How to get the (mapped) position of support points of my element?
1603
1604 Option 1: The support points on the unit cell can be accessed using
1605 FiniteElement::get_unit_support_point(s) and mapped to real coordinates
1606 using Mapping::transform_unit_to_real_cell()
1607
1608 Option 2: DoFTools::map_dofs_to_support_points() maps all the support
1609 points at once.
1610
1611 Option 3: You can create a FEValues object using the support points as a
1612 Quadrature:
1613 <pre>
1614 Quadrature<dim> q(fe.get_unit_support_points());
1615 FEValues<dim> fe_values (..., q, update_q_points);
1616 ...
1617 fe_values.get_quadrature_points();
1618 </pre>
1619
1620
1621 ## Debugging deal.II applications
1622
1623 ### I don't have a whole lot of experience programming large-scale software. Any recommendations?
1624
1625 Yes. First, the questions of this FAQ already give you a number of good
1626 pointers for example on debugging. Also, a good resource for some of the
1627 questions mathematicians, scientists and engineers (who may have taken a
1628 programming course, but know little of the bigger world of software
1629 engineering) typically have, is the [Software
1630 Carpentry](http://software-carpentry.org/) page. That site is specifically
1631 targeted at people who may want to use scientific computing to solve
1632 particular applications, but have little or no formal training in dealing
1633 with large software. In other words, it is specifically written for people
1634 for an audience like the users of deal.II.
1635
1636
1637 ### Are there strategies to avoid bugs in the first place?
1638
1639 Why yes, good you ask. There are indeed techniques that help you avoid
1640 writing code that has bugs. By and large, these techniques go by the name
1641 <i>defensive programming</i>, and the idea is to get yourself into a
1642 mindset while programming that anticipates that you will make mistakes,
1643 rather than expecting that your code is correct and then reacting to the
1644 situation when it turns out that this isn't true. The point is that even
1645 the most experienced programmers do introduce a lot of bugs into their
1646 code; what makes them good is that they have strategies to find them
1647 quickly and systematically.
1648
1649 Below we show one of the most important lessons learned. A more complete
1650 list can be found in [our code conventions
1651 page](http://dealii.org/developer/doxygen/deal.II/CodingConventions.html)
1652 which has a collection of best practices including code snippets to show
1653 how they are used.
1654
1655 The single most successful strategy to avoid bugs is to <i>make assumptions explicit</i>. For example, assume for a second that you have a class that denotes a point in 3d space:
1656 ```cpp
1657   class Point3d
1658   {
1659   public:
1660     double coordinate (const unsigned int i) const;
1661     // ...more here...
1662   private:
1663     double coordinates[3];
1664   };
1665
1666   double
1667   Point3d::coordinate (const unsigned int i) const
1668   {
1669     return coordinates[i];
1670   }
1671 ```
1672
1673 Here, when we wrote the `coordinate()` function, we worked under the
1674 assumption that the index `i` is between zero and two. As long as that
1675 assumption is satisfied, everything is fine. The problems start when
1676 someone calls this function with an index greater than two -- the function
1677 will in that case simply return garbage, but that may not be immediately
1678 obvious and may only much later lead to weird results in your program.
1679 Inexperienced programmers will say "Why would I do that, it doesn't make
1680 any sense!". Defensive programming starts from the premise that this is
1681 something that simply <i>will happen</i> at one point in time, whether you
1682 want to or not. It's actually not very difficult to do, since all of us
1683 have probably written code like this:
1684 ```cpp
1685   Point3d point;
1686   // ... do something with it
1687   double norm = 0;
1688   for (unsigned int i=0; i<=3; ++i)
1689     norm += point.coordinate(i) ** point.coordinate(i);
1690   norm = std::sqrt(norm);
1691 ```
1692
1693 Note that we have accidentally used `<=` instead of `<` in the loop.
1694
1695 If we accept that bugs will happen, we should make it as simple as possible
1696 to find them. In the spirit of making assumptions explicit, let's write
1697 above function like this:
1698 ```cpp
1699   double
1700   Point3d::coordinate (const unsigned int i) const
1701   {
1702     if (i >= 3)
1703       {
1704         std::cout << "Error: function called with invalid argument!" << std::endl;
1705         std::abort ();
1706       }
1707     return coordinates[i]
1708   }
1709 ```
1710
1711 This has the advantage that an error message is produced whenever the
1712 function is called with invalid arguments, and for good measure we also
1713 abort the program to make sure the error message can really not be missed
1714 in the rest of the output of the program. The disadvantage is that this
1715 check will always be performed whenever the program runs, even if it is
1716 well tested and we are fairly certain that in all places where the function
1717 is called, indices are valid. To avoid this drawback, the C programming
1718 language has the `assert` macro, which expands to the code above by
1719 default, but that can be disabled using a compiler flag. deal.II provides
1720 an improved version of this macro that is used as follows:
1721 ```cpp
1722   double
1723   Point3d::coordinate (const unsigned int i) const
1724   {
1725     Assert (i<3, ExcMessage ("Function called with invalid argument!"));
1726     return coordinates[i];
1727   }
1728 ```
1729
1730 The macro expands to nothing in optimized mode (see below), and if it is
1731 triggered in debug mode it doesn't only abort the program, but also prints
1732 an error message and shows how we got to this point in the program.
1733
1734 Using assertions in your program is the single most efficient way to make
1735 assumptions explicit and help find bugs in your program as early as
1736 possible. If you are looking for some more background, check out the
1737 wikipedia articles on
1738 [assertions](http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Assertion_(computing)),
1739 [preconditions](http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Precondition) and
1740 [postconditions](http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Postcondition), and generally
1741 the [design by contract
1742 methodology](http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Design_by_contract).
1743
1744 ### How can deal.II help me find bugs?
1745
1746 In addition to using the `Assert` macro introduced above, the deal.II
1747 libraries come in two flavors: debug mode and optimized mode. The
1748 difference is that the debug mode libraries contain a lot of assertions
1749 that verify the validity of parameters you may pass when calling library
1750 functions and classes; the optimized libraries don't contain these and are
1751 compiled with flags that instruct the compiler to optimize. This makes
1752 executables linked against the optimized libraries between 4 and 10 times
1753 faster. On the other hand, you will find that you will find 90% or more of
1754 your bugs by using the debug libraries because most bugs simply pass data
1755 to other functions that they don't expect or that don't make sense. The
1756 consequence is that you should always use debug mode when you are still
1757 developing your code. Only when it runs without bugs -- and under no
1758 circumstances any earlier -- should you switch to optimized mode to do
1759 production runs. One of the silliest things you can do is switch to
1760 optimized mode because you otherwise get an error you can't make sense of
1761 and that you don't know how to fix; certainly, if the library complains
1762 about something and you ignore it, nothing good can come out of the
1763 remainder of the run of your program.
1764
1765 You can switch between debug and optimized mode, at least for the example
1766 programs, by compiling the example with either `make debug` or `make
1767 release`. There are further
1768 [instructions](https://www.dealii.org/8.3.0/users/cmakelists.html#cmakesimple.build_type)
1769 in the documentation describing how to set this up in your own codes.
1770
1771 ### Should I use a debugger?
1772
1773 This question has an emphatic, unambiguous answer: Yes! You may get by for
1774 a while by just putting debug output into your program, compiling it, and
1775 running it, but ultimately finding bugs with a debugger is much faster,
1776 much more convenient, and more reliable because you don't have to recompile
1777 the program all the time and because you can inspect the values of
1778 variables and how they change. Learn how to use a debugger as soon as
1779 possible. It is time well invested.
1780
1781 Debuggers come in a variety of ways. On Linux and other Unix-like operating
1782 systems, they are almost all based in one way or other on the [GNU Debugger
1783 (GDB)](http://www.gnu.org/s/gdb/). GDB itself is a tool that is driven by
1784 interactively typing commands; if you know your way around with it, it is
1785 quite usable but it is rather austere and unless you are already familiar
1786 with this style of debugging, don't learn it. Rather, you should either use
1787 a graphical front-end or, even better, a front-end to GDB that is
1788 integrated into an Integrated Development Environment (IDE). An example of
1789 the stand-alone graphical front-ends to GDB are
1790 [DDD](http://www.gnu.org/software/ddd/), a program that was the first of
1791 its kind on Linux for many years but whose development has pretty much
1792 ceased in the early 2000s; it is still quite a good program, though.
1793 Another example is [KDbg](http://kdbg.org/), a GDB front-end for the KDE
1794 desktop environment.
1795
1796 As mentioned, a better choice is to use a debugger front-end that is
1797 integrated into the IDE. Every decent IDE has an integrated debugger, so
1798 you have your choice. A list of IDEs and how they work with deal.II is
1799 given in the C++ section of this FAQ.
1800
1801 ### deal.II aborts my program with an error message
1802
1803 You are likely seeing something like the following:
1804 ```
1805 --------------------------------------------------------
1806 An error occurred in line <1223> of file </.../dealii/include/deal.II/lac/vector.h> in function
1807     Number& dealii::Vector<Number>::operator()(dealii::Vector<Number>::size_type)
1808     [with Number = double; dealii::Vector<Number>::size_type = unsigned int]
1809 The violated condition was:
1810     i<vec_size
1811 The name and call sequence of the exception was:
1812     ExcIndexRangeType<size_type>(i,0,vec_size)
1813 Additional Information:
1814 Index 10 is not in the half-open range [0,10).
1815
1816 Stacktrace:
1817 -----------
1818 #0  ./deliberate-mistake: foo()
1819 #1  ./deliberate-mistake: main
1820 --------------------------------------------------------
1821
1822 ```
1823
1824 This error is generated by the following program:
1825 ```cpp
1826 #include <deal.II/lac/vector.h>
1827 using namespace dealii;
1828
1829 void foo ()
1830 {
1831   Vector<double> x(10);
1832   for (unsigned int i=0; i<=x.size(); ++i)
1833     x(i) = i;
1834 }
1835
1836
1837 int main ()
1838 {
1839   foo ();
1840 }
1841 ```
1842
1843 So what to do in a case like this? The first step is to carefully read what
1844 the error message actually says as it contains pretty much all the
1845 information you need. So let's take the error message apart:
1846
1847  - The first two lines tell you where the problem happened: in the current
1848    case, in line 1223 of file
1849    `/.../dealii/include/deal.II/lac/vector.h` in the function
1850    `Number& dealii::Vector<Number>::operator()(dealii::Vector<Number>::size_type)`.
1851    This is a function in the library, so you likely don't know what exactly it
1852    does and what to do with it, but there is more information to come.
1853
1854  - The second part is the condition that should have been true but wasn't,
1855    leading to the error: `i<vec_size`. The variables involved in this
1856    condition (`i,vec_size`) are local variables of the function, or member
1857    variables of the class, so again you may not be entirely familiar with
1858    them. But you can already gather some of the information: `i` likely is
1859    an index, which should have been less than the variable `vec_size`
1860    (which sounds a lot like the length of a vector); the assertion says
1861    that it <i>should</i> have been smaller, but that it wasn't actually.
1862
1863  - There is more information: The exception generated is of kind
1864    `ExcIndexRange<size_type>(i,0,vec_size)` and the additional information says
1865    `Index 10 is not in the half-open range [0,10)`. In other words, the variable
1866    `i` has value `10`, and `vec_size` is also ten. This should already give you
1867    a fairly good idea what is happening: the vector has size ten, and following
1868    C array convention, that means that only indices zero through nine are value,
1869    but ten is not.
1870
1871  - The final part of the error message -- the stack trace -- tells you how
1872    you got to this place: reading from the bottom, `main()` called `foo()`
1873    which called the function that generated the error.
1874
1875 Taken together, this information should allow you figure out in 80% of
1876 cases what was going on, and fix the problem. Here, it is that we used the
1877 condition `i<=x.size()` in the loop, rather than the correct condition
1878 `i<x.size()`. In the remaining 20% of cases, things might be more
1879 difficult. For example, `foo()` might be a large and difficult function,
1880 and you would need to know in which part of the function did we access an
1881 invalid index of the vector. Or `i` was an index computed from other
1882 variables and you'd need to find out why it got the invalid value. In these
1883 cases, you'll have to learn how to use a debugger such as gdb, and in
1884 particular how to move up and down in the call stack and to inspect local
1885 variables in your source code.
1886
1887 ### The program aborts saying that an exception was thrown, but I can't find out where
1888
1889 deal.II creates two kinds of exceptions (in deal.II language): ones where we
1890 simply abort the program because you are doing something that can't be right
1891 (such as accessing element 11 of a 10-element vector; this results in what has
1892 been discussed in the previous question) and ones that use the C++ construct
1893 `throw` to raise an exception. The latter construct is used for things that
1894 can't be statically checked in debug mode because they may depend on values
1895 read from input files or on a status that may simply change from one run of
1896 the program to the next; consequently, they <i>always</i> need to be verified,
1897 not only in debug mode, and there is sometimes a way to work around it in a
1898 program. The typical case is trying to write to a file that can't be opened
1899 (e.g. because the directory/file you specified in a parameter file doesn't
1900 exist or because the file system has run out of disk space).
1901
1902 Most of the time, the exceptions deal.II throws are annotated with the
1903 location and function where this exception was raised, and if you use a
1904 `main()` function such as the one used starting in step-6, this information
1905 will be printed. However, there are also cases where this kind of information
1906 is not available and then it is often difficult to establish where exactly the
1907 problem is coming from: all you know is that an exception was thrown, but not
1908 where or why.
1909
1910 To debug such problems, two approaches have proven useful:
1911
1912  - Run your program in a debugger (see the question about debuggers above,
1913    as well as these videos showing how to use the debugger in
1914    22c8e221823811aa1178b450171824af:
1915    http://www.math.tamu.edu/~bangerth/videos.676.8.html,
1916    http://www.math.tamu.edu/~bangerth/videos.676.25.html). You need to
1917    instruct the debugger to stop whenever an exception is thrown. If you
1918    work with gdb on the command line, then issue the command `catch throw`
1919    before starting the program and it will stop everytime the code executes
1920    a `throw` statement. Integrated development environments typically also
1921    have ways of switching this on. Note that not every exception that is
1922    thrown actually indicates an error -- sometimes, there are legitimate
1923    reasons to throw an exception and catch it in the calling function, so
1924    you may have to continue (resume) a number of times before finding the
1925    place where this happens.
1926
1927  - Debugging by subtraction: Starting at the end of your program, remove
1928    one function/code block after the other until your program runs through
1929    without aborting. For example, if your program looked like step-6, see
1930    if it runs through if you don't create graphical output in `run()`. If
1931    it does, then you know that the exception must have been thrown in the
1932    block of code you just removed. If the program continues to abort, then
1933    reduce the number of mesh refinement cycles to find out within which
1934    cycle the problem happens. If it happens in the very first cycle, then
1935    remove calling the linear solver. If the program now runs through, then
1936    the problem happened in the solver. If it still aborts, then it must
1937    have happened before the solver, for example in the assembly. Repeating
1938    this, you will be able to narrow down which statement caused the
1939    problem, and knowing where a problem happens is already more than half
1940    of what you need to know to fix it.
1941
1942
1943 ### I get an exception in `virtual dealii::Subscriptor::~Subscriptor()` that makes no sense to me!
1944
1945 The full text of the error message probably looks something like this (the
1946 stack trace at the bottom is of course different in your code):
1947 ```
1948 An error occurred in line <103> of file </.../deal.II/source/base/subscriptor.cc> in function
1949     virtual dealii::Subscriptor::~Subscriptor()
1950 The violated condition was:
1951     counter == 0
1952 The name and call sequence of the exception was:
1953     ExcInUse (counter, object_info->name(), infostring)
1954 Additional Information:
1955 Object of class N6dealii15SparsityPatternE is still used by 5 other objects.
1956   from Subscriber SparseMatrix
1957
1958 Stacktrace:
1959 -----------
1960 #0  /.../deal.II/lib/libdeal_II.g.so.7.0.0: dealii::Subscriptor::~Subscriptor()
1961 #1  /.../deal.II/lib/libdeal_II.g.so.7.0.0: dealii::SparsityPattern::~SparsityPattern()
1962 #2  /.../deal.II/lib/libdeal_II.g.so.7.0.0: dealii::BlockSparsityPatternBase<dealii::SparsityPattern>::reinit(unsigned int, unsigned int)
1963 #3  /.../deal.II/lib/libdeal_II.g.so.7.0.0: dealii::BlockSparsityPattern::reinit(unsigned int, unsigned int)
1964 #4  /.../deal.II/lib/libdeal_II.g.so.7.0.0: dealii::BlockSparsityPattern::copy_from(dealii::BlockCompressedSimpleSparsityPattern const&)
1965 #5  ./step-6: NavierStokesProjectionIB<2>::setup_system()
1966 #6  ./step-6: NavierStokesProjectionIB<2>::run(bool, unsigned int)
1967 #7  ./step-6: main
1968 ```
1969
1970 What is happening is this: deal.II derives a bunch of classes from the
1971 `Subscriptor` base class and then uses the `SmartPointer` class to point to
1972 such objects. `SmartPointer` is actually a fairly simple class: when given
1973 a pointer, it increases a counter in the `Subscriptor` base of the object
1974 pointed to by one, and when the pointer is reset to another object or goes
1975 out of scope, it decreases the counter again. (It can also records
1976 <i>who</i> points to this object.) If someone tries to delete the object
1977 pointed to, then the destructor `dealii::Subscriptor::~Subscriptor()` is
1978 run and checks that in fact the counter in this object is zero, i.e. that
1979 nobody is pointing to the object any more -- because if some pointer was
1980 still pointing to it, it would be a poor decision to delete the object as
1981 then the pointer would point to invalid memory. If the counter is nonzero,
1982 you get the error above: you are trying to delete an object that is still
1983 pointed to. In the case above, you try to delete a `SparsityPattern` object
1984 (that is, from the stack trace, a part of a block sparsity pattern) even
1985 though there is still a `SparseMatrix` pointing to it (we get this from the
1986 "Additional Information" field).
1987
1988 The solution in cases like these is to make sure that at the time you
1989 delete the object, no other objects still have pointers that point to it.
1990
1991 There is one rather frequent case that results in an error like the above
1992 and that is often difficult to understand: if an exception is thrown in
1993 some function and not caught, all local objects are destroyed in the
1994 opposite order of their declaration; if it isn't caught in the function
1995 that called the place where the exception was generated, its local
1996 variables are also destroyed, and so on. This automatic destruction of
1997 objects typically bypasses all the clean-up code you may have at the end of
1998 a function and can then lead to errors like the above. For example, take
1999 this code:
2000 ```cpp
2001 void f()
2002 {
2003   SparseMatrix s;
2004   SparsityPattern sp;
2005   // initialize sp somehow
2006   s.reinit (sp);
2007   Vector v;
2008   // build a linear system
2009
2010   solve_linear_system (s, v);
2011
2012   s.reinit ();
2013 }
2014 ```
2015
2016 If the code executes normally, at the bottom of the function, the local
2017 variables `s,sp,v` will be destroyed in reverse order. Since we have called
2018 `s.reinit()`, the object no longer stores a pointer to `sp` and so
2019 destruction of `sp` before `s` incurs no harm. But if the function
2020 `solve_linear_system` throws an exception, for example because the linear
2021 system is singular, the call to `s.reinit()` isn't executed any more, and
2022 you will get an error like the one shown at the top.
2023
2024 In cases like these, the challenge becomes finding where the exception was
2025 thrown. The easiest way is to run your program in a debugger and let the
2026 debugger tell you whenever an exception is generated. In `gdb`, you can do
2027 that by saying `catch throw` before running the program; essentially, the
2028 command puts a breakpoint on all places where exceptions are thrown.
2029 Remember, however, that not every place where an exception is thrown is a
2030 candidate for the problem above: it may also be an exception that is caught
2031 in the function above and that never propagates to a point where it
2032 produces trouble. Consequently, it may well happen that you have to
2033 continue several times after seeing an exception thrown until you finally
2034 find the place where the offending exception happens.
2035
2036 ### I get an error that the solver doesn't converge. But which solver?
2037
2038 Solvers are often deeply nested -- take a look for example at step-20 or
2039 step-22, where there is an outer solver for a Schur complement matrix, but
2040 both in the implementation of the Schur complement as well as in the
2041 implementation of the preconditioner we solve other linear problems which
2042 themselves may have to be preconditioned, etc. So if you get an exception
2043 that the solver didn't converge, which one is it?
2044
2045 The way to find out is to not wait till the exception propagates all the
2046 way to `main()` and display the error code there. Rather, you probably
2047 don't have a Plan B anyway if a solver fails, so you may want to abort the
2048 program if that happens. To do this, wrap the call to the solver in a
2049 try-catch block like this:
2050 ```cpp
2051   try
2052   {
2053     cg.solve (system_matrix, solution, system_rhs, preconditioner);
2054   }
2055   catch (...)
2056   {
2057     std::cerr << "*** Failure in Schur complement solver! ***" << std::endl;
2058     std::abort ();
2059   }
2060 ```
2061
2062 Of course, if this is in the Schur preconditioner, you may want to use a
2063 different error message. In any case, what this code does is catch the
2064 exceptions thrown by the solver here, or by the system matrix's `vmult`
2065 function (if not already caught there) or by the preconditioner (if not
2066 already caught there). If you had already caught exceptions in the `vmult`
2067 function and in the preconditioner, then you now know that any exception
2068 you get at this location must have been because the CG solver failed, not
2069 the preconditioner, etc. The upshot is that you need to wrap <i>every</i>
2070 call to a solver with such a try-catch block.
2071
2072 ### How do I know whether my finite element solution is correct? (Or: What is the "Method of Manufactured Solutions"?)
2073
2074 This is not always trivial, but there is an "industry-standard" way of
2075 verifying that your code works as intended, called the '''method of
2076 manufactured solutions'''. Before we describe the method, let us point this
2077 out: '''A code that has not been verified (i.e. for which correctness has
2078 not been established) is worthless. You do not want to have results in your
2079 thesis or a publication that may later turn out to be incorrect because
2080 your code does not converge to the correct solution!'''
2081
2082 The idea to verify a code is that you need a problem for which you know the
2083 exact solution. Unless you solve the very simplest possible partial
2084 differential equations, it is typically not possible to choose a right hand
2085 side and boundary values and then find the corresponding solution to the
2086 PDE analytically, on a piece of paper. But you can turn this around: Let's
2087 say your equation is <i>Lu=f</i>, then choose some function <i>u</i> and
2088 compute <i>f=Lu</i>. Note that the solution <i>u</i> does not necessarily
2089 have to be something that looks like a useful or physically reasonable
2090 solution to the equation, all that is necessary is that it is a function
2091 you know. Because <i>L</i> is a differential operator, computing <i>f</i>
2092 only involves computing the derivatives of the known function; this may
2093 yield lengthy expressions if you have nonlinearities or spatially variable
2094 coefficients in the equation, but should not be too complicated and can
2095 also be done using computer algebra programs such as Maple or Mathematica.
2096
2097 If you now put this particular right hand side <i>f</i> into your program
2098 (along with boundary values that correspond to the values of the function
2099 <i>u</i> you have chosen) you will get a numerical solution
2100 <i>u<sub>h</sub></i> that we would hope converges against the exact
2101 solution <i>u</i> at a particular rate, say <i>O(h<sup>2</sup>)</i> in the
2102 <i>L<sub>2</sub></i> norm. But since you know the exact solution (you have
2103 chosen it before), you can compute the error between numerical solution and
2104 exact solution, and verify not only that your code converges, but also that
2105 it shows the convergence rate you expect.
2106
2107 The method of manufactured solutions is shown in the step-7 tutorial
2108 program.
2109
2110 ### My program doesn't produce the expected output!
2111
2112 There are of course many possible causes for this, and you need to find out
2113 which of these causes might be the reason. Possible places to start are:
2114
2115  - Are matrix and right hand side assembled correctly? For most reasonably
2116    simple problems, you can compute the local contributions to these
2117    matrices by hand, and then compare those with the ones you compute on
2118    every cell of your program (remember that you can print the contents of
2119    the local matrix and right hand side to screen). A good strategy is also
2120    to reduce your problem to a 1x1 or 2x2 mesh and then print out the
2121    entire system matrix for comparison.
2122
2123  - Do you compute the matrix you need, or its transpose? The mathematical
2124    literature often multiplies the equation from the right with a test
2125    function but that is awkward because the matrix you get this way is the
2126    transpose from the one you need. The deal.II documentation goes to
2127    lengths in multiplying test functions from the left to avoid this sort
2128    of error; do the same in your derivations.
2129
2130  - Your constraints or boundary values may be wrong. While the
2131    ConstraintMatrix and functions like
2132    VectorTools::interpolate_boundary_values are well enough tested that
2133    they are unlikely candidates for problems, you may have computed
2134    constraints wrongly if you collect them by hand (for example if you deal
2135    with periodic boundary conditions or similar) or you may have specified
2136    the wrong boundary indicator for a Dirichlet boundary condition. Again,
2137    the solution is to reduce the problem to the simplest one you can find
2138    (e.g. on the 1x1 or 2x2 mesh talked about above) and to ask the
2139    ConstraintMatrix to print its contents so that you can compare it by
2140    hand with your expectations.
2141
2142  - Your discretization might be wrong. Some equations require you to use
2143    particular (combination of) finite elements; for example, for the Stokes
2144    equations and many other saddle point problems, you need to satisfy an
2145    LBB or Babuska-Brezzi condition. For other equations, you need to add
2146    stabilization terms to the bilinear form; for example, advection or
2147    transport dominated problems require stabilization terms such as
2148    artificial diffusion, streamlinear diffusion, or SUPG.
2149
2150  - The solver might be wrong. This can reasonably easily happen if you have
2151    a complex solver such as, for example, the one used in step-22. In such
2152    cases it has proven useful to simply replace the entire solver by the
2153    sparse direct UMFPACK solver (see step-29). UMFPACK is not the fastest
2154    solver around, but it never fails: if the linear system has a solution,
2155    UMFPACK will find it. If the output of your program is essentially the
2156    same as before, then the solver wasn't your problem.
2157
2158  - Your assumptions may be wrong. Double check that you had the correct
2159    right hand side to compute the numerical solution you compare against
2160    your analytical one. Also remember that the numerical solution is
2161    usually only an approximation of the true one.
2162
2163 In general, if your program is not computing the output you expect, here
2164 are a few strategies that have often worked in finding the problem:
2165  - Take a good look at the output you get. For example, a close look can
2166    already tell you if (i) the boundary conditions are correct, (ii) the
2167    solution is continuous at hanging nodes, (iii) the solution follows the
2168    characteristics of the right hand side. This may already help you narrow
2169    down which part of the program may be the culprit. A common mistake is
2170    also to have a solution that by some accident is too large by a certain
2171    factor; consequently, the error will not converge to zero but to some
2172    constant value. This, again, is easily visible from a graphical
2173    representation of the solution and/or the error. Plotting the error is
2174    discussed in the section below entitled "How to plot the error as a
2175    pointwise function".
2176  - If you have a time dependent problem, is the first time step right?
2177    There is no point in running the program for 1000 time steps and trying
2178    to find our why it is wrong, if already the first time step is wrong.
2179  - If you still can't find what's going on, make the program as small as
2180    possible. Copy it to another directory and start stripping off parts
2181    that you don't need. For example, if it is a time dependent program for
2182    which you have previously already found out that the first time step is
2183    wrong, then remove the time loop. If you have tried whether you have the
2184    same problem when the mesh is uniformly refined, then throw out all the
2185    code that deals with adaptive refinement, constraints and hanging nodes.
2186    In this process, every time you simplify the program, verify that the
2187    problem is still there. If the problem disappears, you know that it must
2188    have been in the last simplification step. If the problem remains, it
2189    must be in the code that is now one step smaller. Ultimately, the code
2190    should be small enough so that you can just go through it and find the
2191    error by inspection.
2192  - Learn to use a debugger. You will find that using a debugger is so much
2193    more convenient than trying to put screen output statements into your
2194    code, recompiling, and hoping that they reveal the problem. Modern
2195    integrated development environment as the ones discussed elsewhere in
2196    this FAQ have the debugger built-in, allowing you to use it seamlessly
2197    in your editing environment.
2198
2199 ### The solution converges initially, but the error doesn't go down below 10<sup>-8</sup>!
2200
2201 First: If the error converges to zero, then you are basically doing
2202 something right already. Congratulations!
2203
2204 As for why the error does not converge any further, there are two typical
2205 cases what could be the reason:
2206
2207  - While the discretization error should converge to zero, the error of
2208    your numerical solution is composed of both the discretization error and
2209    the error of your linear or nonlinear solver. If, for example, you solve
2210    the linear system to an accuracy of 10<sup>-5</sup>, then there will be
2211    a point where the discretization error will get smaller than that by
2212    using finer and finer meshes but the solver error will not become
2213    smaller any more. To continue observing the correct convergence order,
2214    you will also have to solve the linear system with more accuracy.
2215
2216  - If you compute the error through an external program, for example by
2217    writing out the solution to a file and reading it from another program
2218    that knows about the exact solution, then you need to make sure you
2219    write the solution with sufficient accuracy. The default setting of C++
2220    writes floating point numbers with approximately 8 digits, so if you
2221    want to make sure that your solution is correct to 10<sup>-10</sup>, for
2222    example, you'll have to write out the solution with more than 10 digits.
2223
2224
2225 ### My code converges with one version of deal.II but not with another
2226
2227 That is a tough case because the problem could literally be anywhere in the functions you call from deal.II.
2228 Rather than trying to start debugging blindly to find out what exactly is going on it's probably more productive to delineate the steps one could use to narrow down where the problem is.
2229
2230 In an ideal world, you would have already found out which commit in the history of deal.II caused the problem.
2231 Let's say you have checked out the two offending versions of deal.II into separate source directories `dealii-good` and `dealii-bad`, and that you compiled them both separately and installed them into directories `install-good` and `install-bad`. If you can't find out which commit caused the problem, the good and bad versions could also be the last two releases.
2232
2233 Let's also say that you have a directory `application` in which you have your own code.
2234 Now create two directories, `app-good`, `app-bad` parallel to `application`. Then do
2235 ```bash
2236   cd application
2237   for i in * ; do
2238     ln -s $i ../app-good/$i
2239     ln -s $i ../app-bad/$i
2240   done
2241 ```
2242 This way you have two directories in which you can configure, compile, and run the exact same version of your application (exact same because they both contain links to the exact same source files), just compiled against the good and bad versions of the library, respectively.
2243
2244 So you do
2245 ```bash
2246   cd app-good
2247   cmake . -DDEAL_II_DIR=.../install-good
2248   make
2249
2250   cd ../app-bad
2251   cmake . -DDEAL_II_DIR=.../install-bad
2252   make
2253 ```
2254 If you run in these two directories, e.g., in two separate xterm windows, you will get one working and one failing run. Now start modifying the source files in `application` to figure out where the first point in the program is where there are differences. For example, after assembly, you could do insert a statement of the form
2255 ```cpp
2256   std::cout << "Linear system: " << system_matrix.l1_norm() << ' ' << system_rhs.l2_norm() << std::endl;
2257 ```
2258 I would suspect (though that doesn't have to be true -- but just assume for the moment) that if you compile and run this modification in your two windows that you will get different results. At this point, you can remove everything that is executed after this point from your program -- likely a few hundred lines of code. Or, if you're too lazy, just put `abort()` after that statement because everything that comes after it clearly only shows symptoms but not the cause of the problem.
2259
2260 Now that you know that the problem exists at the end of assembly, make your way further forward in the program. For example, is the local matrix on the first cell on which you assemble the same between the two programs? If it is, the problem is on a later cell. If it isn't the same, try to think about what the cause may be. Is the mesh the same? You can test that by putting output into an earlier spot of the program; if that output is different between the two programs, you can again delete everything that happens after that point.
2261
2262 The whole exercise is designed to find the first place in the program where you can unambiguously say that something has changed. Non-convergence is just such a non-specific problem that it is not helpful in finding what exactly is going on. It also happens rather late in typical programs that there are too many possibilities for where the root cause may be.
2263
2264 ### My time dependent solver does not produce the correct answer!
2265
2266 For time dependent problems, there are a number of other things you can try
2267 over the discussion already given in the previous answer. In particular:
2268
2269  - If you have a time iteration and the solution at the final time (where
2270    you may evaluate the error) is wrong, then it was likely already wrong
2271    at the first time step. Try to run your program only for a single time
2272    step and make sure the solution there is correct. For example, it could
2273    be that you set the boundary values wrongly; this would be quite
2274    apparent if you looked at the first time step because the effect would
2275    be largest close to the boundary, but it may no longer be visible if you
2276    ran your program for a couple hundred time steps.
2277
2278  - Are your initial values correct? Output the initial values using DataOut
2279    just like you output the solution and inspect it for correctness.
2280
2281  - If you have a multi-stage time stepping scheme, are *all* the initial
2282    values correct?
2283
2284  - Finally, you can test your scheme by setting the time step to zero. In
2285    that case, the solution at time step zero should of course be equal to
2286    the solution at time step zero. If it isn't, you already know better
2287    where to look.
2288
2289 ### My Newton method for a nonlinear problem does not converge (or converges too slowly)!
2290
2291 Newton methods are tricky to get right. In particular, they sometimes
2292 converge (if slowly) even though the implementation has a bug because all
2293 that is required for convergence is that the search direction is a
2294 direction of descent; consequently, if for example you have the wrong
2295 matrix, you may compute something that is a direction of descent, but not
2296 the full Newton direction, and so converges but not at quadratic order.
2297
2298 Here are a few considerations for implementing Newton's method for
2299 nonlinear PDEs:
2300
2301  - Try it with a linear program by removing all the nonlinearities in your
2302    problem. Your Newton iteration must converge in a single step, i.e. the
2303    Newton residual must be zero at the beginning of the second iteration.
2304    If that's not the case, something is wrong in your implementation.
2305
2306  - Newton's iteration will converge with optimal order for the problem
2307    *R(u)=0*, where *R* may be thought of as a residual, if you
2308    <i>consistently</i> compute the Newton residual
2309    *(&phi;<sup>i</sup>, R(u<sup>k</sup>))* and the Newton (Jacobian) matrix
2310    *R'(u<sup>k</sup>)*. If you have
2311    a bug in either of the two, your method may converge, but typically at a
2312    (much) lower rate and with consequently many more iterations.
2313
2314    Consequently, one way to debug Newton's methods is to verify that the Newton
2315    matrix and Newton residual are matching in their code. However, if you
2316    have a matching bug in <i>both</i> of the matrix and right hand side
2317    assembly, then your Newton method will converge with correct order but
2318    against the wrong solution.
2319
2320  - If you have nonzero boundary values for your problem, set the correct
2321    boundary values for the initial guess and use zero boundary values for
2322    all following updates. This way, the updated
2323    *u<sup>k+1</sup> = u<sup>k</sup> + &delta; u<sup>k</sup>*
2324    already has the right boundary values for all following iterations, where
2325    *&delta; u<sup>k</sup>* is the Newton update.
2326
2327  - If your problem is strongly nonlinear, you may need to employ a line
2328    search where you compute
2329    *u<sup>k+1</sup> = u<sup>k</sup> + &alpha; &delta; u<sup>k</sup>*
2330    and successively try *&alpha;=1, &alpha;=1/2, &alpha;=1/4*, etc., until the
2331    residual computed for *u<sup>k+1</sup>* for this *&alpha;* is smaller than
2332    the residual for *u<sup>k</sup>*.
2333
2334  - A rule of thumb is that if your problem is strongly nonlinear, you may
2335    need 5 or 10 iterations with a step length *&alpha;* less than one, and
2336    all following steps use the full step length *&alpha;=1*.
2337
2338  - For most reasonably behaved problems, once your iteration reaches the
2339    point where it takes full steps, it usually converges in 5 or 10 more
2340    iterations to very high accuracy. If you need significantly more than 10
2341    iterations, something is likely wrong.
2342
2343 ### Printing deal.II data types in debuggers is barely readable!
2344
2345 Indeed. For example, plain gdb prints this for cell iterators:
2346 ```
2347 $2 = {<dealii::TriaIterator<dealii::DoFCellAccessor<dealii::DoFHandler<2, 3> > >> = {<dealii::TriaRawIterator<dealii::DoFCellAccessor<dealii::DoFHandler<2, 3> > >> = {<std::iterator<std::bidirectional_iterator_tag, dealii::DoFCellAccessor<dealii::DoFHandler<2, 3> >, long, dealii::DoFCellAccessor<dealii::DoFHandler<2, 3> >*, dealii::DoFCellAccessor<dealii::DoFHandler<2, 3> >&>> = {<No data fields>},
2348       accessor = {<dealii::DoFAccessor<2, dealii::DoFHandler<2, 3> >> = {<dealii::CellAccessor<2, 3>> = {<dealii::TriaAccessor<2, 2, 3>> = {<dealii::TriaAccessorBase<2, 2, 3>> = {
2349                 static space_dimension = <optimized out>, static dimension = <optimized out>,
2350                 static structure_dimension = <optimized out>, present_level = -9856,
2351                 present_index = 32767, tria = 0x4a1556}, <No data fields>}, <No data fields>},
2352           static dimension = 2, static space_dimension = 3, dof_handler = 0x7fffffffdac8},
2353         static dim = <optimized out>,
2354         static spacedim = <optimized out>}}, <No data fields>}, <No data fields>}
2355 ```
2356
2357 Fortunately, this can be simplified to this:
2358 ```cpp
2359 $3 = {
2360   triangulation = 0x4a1556,
2361   dof_handler = 0x7fffffffdac8,
2362   level = 2,
2363   index = 52
2364 }
2365 ```
2366
2367 All you need is (i) gdb version 7.1 or later, or a graphical frontend for
2368 it (e.g. [DDD](http://www.gnu.org/software/ddd/) or
2369 [kdevelop](http://www.kdevelop.org)), (ii) some code that goes into your
2370 $HOME/.gdbinit file. Instructions for setting up this file, which implements
2371 pretty printers for `Point`, `Tensor`, `Vector`, and the various iterator
2372 classes for triangulations and DoFHandlers, are posted
2373 [here](Debugging-with-GDB).
2374
2375 gdb can also pretty print many of the `std::XXX` classes, but not all linux
2376 distributions have it configured this way. To enable this, follow the
2377 instructions [from this
2378 website](http://sourceware.org/gdb/wiki/STLSupport). The little python
2379 snippet can be placed as a separate python block into `.gdbinit`.
2380
2381 ### My program is slow!
2382
2383 This is a problem that is true for a lot of us. The question is which part
2384 of your program is causing it. Before going into more detail, there are,
2385 however, some general observations:
2386
2387  - Running deal.II programs in debug mode will take, depending on the program,
2388    between 4 and 10 times as long as in optimized mode. If you are using the
2389    standard setup for your own `CMakeLists.txt` file (described in the
2390    [documentation](https://www.dealii.org/8.3.0/users/cmakelists.html)), then
2391    compiling your code with `make release` will both compile your code at a
2392    higher optimization level and link it against the optimized version of
2393    deal.II.
2394
2395  - A typical finite element program will spend around one third of its time
2396    in assembling linear systems, around one half in solving these linear
2397    systems, and the rest of the time on other things. If your program's
2398    percentages significant deviate from this rule of thumb, you know where
2399    to start.
2400
2401  - There is a rule that says that even the best programmers are unable to
2402    point out where in the program the most CPU time is spent without some
2403    form of profiling. This is definitely true also for the primary
2404    developers of deal.II, so it is likely true for you as well. A corollary
2405    to this rule is that if you start optimizing parts of your code without
2406    first profiling it, you are more than likely just going to make things
2407    more complicated without significant gains because you pick the simplest
2408    places to optimize, not the ones with the biggest impact.
2409
2410 So how can you find out which parts of the program are slow? There are two
2411 tools that we've really come to like, both from the
2412 [valgrind](http://www.valgrind.org/) project: callgrind and cachegrind.
2413 Valgrind essentially emulates what your CPU would do with your program and
2414 in the process collects all sorts of information. In particular, if you run
2415 your program as in
2416 ```
2417   valgrind --tool=callgrind ./myprogram
2418 ```
2419
2420 (this will take around 10 times longer than when you just call
2421 `./myprogram` because of the emulation) then the result will be a file in
2422 this directory that contains information about where your program spent its
2423 time. There are a number of graphical frontends that can visualize this
2424 data; my favorite is `kcachegrind` (a misnomer -- it is, despite its name,
2425 actually a frontend from callgrind, not cachegrind). Pictures of how this
2426 output looks can be found in the introduction of step-22. It typically
2427 shows how much time was spent in each function and a call graph of which
2428 functions where called from where.
2429
2430 Using valgrind's cachegrind can give you a more detailed look at much of
2431 the same kind of information. In particular, it can show you source line
2432 for source line how many instructions were executed there, and how many
2433 memory accesses (as well as cache hits and misses) were generated there.
2434 See the valgrind manual for more information.
2435
2436 Lastly, since you are probably most interested in the performance of the
2437 optimized version of your code (which you will probably use for long
2438 expensive runs), you should run valgrind on the optimized executable.
2439
2440 ### How do I debug MPI programs?
2441
2442 This is clearly an awkward topic for which there are few good options:
2443 debugging parallel programs using MPI has always been a pain and it is
2444 frustrating even to experienced programmers. That said, there are parallel
2445 debuggers that can deal with MPI, for example
2446 [TotalView](http://www.roguewave.com/products/totalview-family/totalview.aspx)
2447 that can make this process at least somewhat simpler.
2448
2449 Whether you have or don't have TotalView, here are a few guidelines of
2450 strategies that have helped us in the past:
2451
2452  - Try to reduce the problem to the smallest one you can find: The smallest
2453    mesh, the smallest number of processors. Reducing the number of
2454    processors needed to demonstrate the bug must be your highest priority.
2455
2456  - One of the biggest problems you typically have is that the processes
2457    that communicate via MPI typically run on different machines. If you can
2458    manage to reduce the problem to a small enough number of processors, you
2459    can run them all locally on a single workstation, rather than a cluster
2460    of computers. Ideally, you would reduce the problem to 2 or 4 processors
2461    and then just start the program using `mpirun -np 4 ./myexecutable` on
2462    the headnode of the cluster, a workstation, or even a laptop.
2463
2464  - Try to figure out which MPI process (the MPI rank) has the problem, for
2465    example by printing the output of
2466    `Utilities::System::get_this_mpi_process(MPI_COMM_WORLD)` at various
2467    points in your program.
2468
2469  - If you know which MPI process has the problem and if this is
2470    reproducible, let each process print out its MPI rank and its process id
2471    (PID) using the system function `getpid` at the very beginning of the
2472    program. The PID is going to be different every time you run the
2473    program, but if you know the connection between MPI rank and PID and you
2474    know which rank will produce the problem, then you can predict which PID
2475    will have the problem. The point of this is that you can attach a
2476    debugger to this PID; for example, `gdb` has the command `attach <pid>`
2477    with which you can attach the debugger to a running program, rather than
2478    running the program from the start within the debugger. Attaching a
2479    program to the debugger will stop it (and, after a while, will typically
2480    also stop all the other MPI processes once they come to a place where
2481    they are waiting for a communication from the stopped process). You can
2482    then look at variables, continue running to breakpoints, or do whatever
2483    else you want to do with the process you attached the debugger to. In
2484    particular, if for example you attached the debugger to the process that
2485    you know will segfault or run onto a failing assertion, you can just
2486    type `continue` in the debugger to let the program continue till it
2487    aborts. You can then inspect the state of the program at the point of
2488    the problem inside the debugger you attached.
2489
2490  - The above process relies on the fact that you have time to attach a
2491    debugger between starting the program, reading the mapping from MPI
2492    process rank to PID, and attaching a debugger. If the program produces
2493    the error very quickly, it is often useful to insert a call to
2494    `sleep(60);` (and including the appropriate header file) just after
2495    outputting MPI rank and PID. This gives you 60 seconds to attach the
2496    debugger before the program will continue.
2497
2498  - If finding out which MPI process has the problem turns out to be too
2499    complicated, or if it isn't predictable which process will produce an
2500    error, then there is a fallback option: attach a debugger to
2501    <i>every</i> MPI process. This is awkward to do by hand, but there is a
2502    shortcut: under linux (or any other unix system) you can run
2503    the program as in
2504 ```
2505   mpirun -np 4 xterm -e gdb --args ./my_executable
2506 ```
2507 The equivalent for macOS is
2508 ```
2509   mpirun -np 4 xterm -e lldb -f ./my_executable
2510 ```
2511
2512 In this example, we start 4 MPI processes; in each of these 4 processes, we
2513 open an `xterm` window in which we start an instance of `gdb`/`lldb` with the
2514 executable. You'd then `run` the executable in each of the 4 windows, and
2515 debug it as you usually would. This might be tedious but as mentioned
2516 above, debugging MPI programs often is tedious indeed. To find out which
2517 gdb window belongs to which MPI rank, you can type the command
2518 ```
2519   !export | grep RANK
2520 ```
2521 into the gdb window (this works with OpenMPI at least). See https://plus.google.com/+TimoHeister/posts/AgmoMT8W7GZ for more info.
2522
2523 ### I have an MPI program that hangs
2524
2525 Apart from programs that segfault or that run onto a failing assertion
2526 (both cases that are relatively easy to debug using the techniques above),
2527 programs that just hang are the most common problem in parallel
2528 programming. The typical cause for this is that there is a point in your
2529 program where all or some MPI processes expect to get a message from a
2530 process X (e.g. in a global communication, say MPI_Reduce, MPI_Barrier, or
2531 directly in point-to-point communications) but process X is not where it
2532 should be -- for example, because it is in an endless loop, or -- more
2533 likely -- because process X didn't think that it should participate in this
2534 communication. In either case, the other processes will wait forever for
2535 process X's message and deadlock the program. An example for this case
2536 would go like this:
2537 ```cpp
2538   void assemble_system ()
2539   {
2540     // optimization in case there is nothing to do; we won't
2541     // have to initialize FEValues and other local objects in
2542     // that case
2543     if (tria.n_locally_owned_active_cells() == 0)
2544       return;
2545
2546     ...
2547     for (cell = ...)
2548       if (!cell->is_ghost() && !cell->is_artificial())
2549         ...do the assembly on the locally owned cells...
2550
2551     system_rhs.compress();
2552   }
2553 ```
2554
2555 Here, the call to `compress()` at the end involves communication between
2556 MPI processes. In particular, say, it implies that process Y will wait for
2557 some data from process X. Now what happens if process X realizes that it
2558 doesn't have any locally owned cells? In that case, process X will quit the
2559 function at the very top, and will never call `compress()`. In other words,
2560 process Y will wait forever, possibly making process Z wait further down
2561 the program etc. In the end, the program will be deadlocked.
2562
2563 The goal of debugging the program must be to find where individual
2564 processes are stopped in order to determine which incoming communication
2565 they are waiting for. If you attached a debugger to the program above,
2566 you'd find for example that all but one process is stopped in the call to
2567 `compress()`, and the one remaining process is stopped in some other MPI
2568 call, then you already have a good idea what may be going on.
2569
2570 ### One statement/block/function in my MPI program takes a long time
2571
2572 Let's say you have a block of code that you suspect takes a long time and
2573 you want to time it like this:
2574 ```cpp
2575   Timer t;
2576   t.start();
2577   my_function();
2578   t.stop();
2579   if (my MPI rank == 0)
2580     std::cout << "Calling my_function() took " << timer() << " seconds." << std::endl;
2581 ```
2582
2583 The output is large, i.e. you think that the function you called is taking
2584 a long time to execute and that you should focus your efforts on optimizing
2585 it. But in an MPI program, this isn't quite always true. Imagine, for
2586 example, that the function looked like this:
2587 ```cpp
2588   void my_function ()
2589   {
2590     double val = compute_something_locally();
2591     double global_sum = 0;
2592     MPI_Reduce (&val, &global_sum, MPI_DOUBLE, 1, 0, MPI_COMM_WORLD);
2593     if (my MPI rank == 0)
2594       std::cout << "Global sum = " << global_sum << std::endl;
2595   }
2596 ```
2597
2598 In the call to `MPI_Reduce`, all processors have to send something to
2599 processor zero. Processor zero will have to wait till everyone sends stuff
2600 to this processor. But what if processor X is still busy doing something
2601 else (stuff above the call to `my_function`) for a while? The processor
2602 zero will wait for quite a while, not because the operations in
2603 `my_function` are particularly expensive (either on processor zero or
2604 processor X) but because processor X was still busy doing something else.
2605 In other words: you need to direct your efforts in making the "something
2606 else on processor X" faster, not making `my_function` faster.
2607
2608 To find out whether this is really the problem, here is a simple way to see
2609 what the "real" cost of `my_function` is:
2610 ```cpp
2611   Timer t;
2612   MPI_Barrier (MPI_COMM_WORLD);
2613   t.start();
2614   my_function();
2615   MPI_Barrier (MPI_COMM_WORLD);
2616   t.stop();
2617   if (my MPI rank == 0)
2618     std::cout << "Calling my_function() took " << timer() << " seconds." << std::endl;
2619 ```
2620
2621 This way, you really only measure the time spent between when all
2622 processors have finished doing what they were doing before, and when they
2623 are all finished doing what they needed to do for `my_function`.
2624
2625 Another way to find some answers is to use the capabilities of the `Timer`
2626 class which can provide more detailed information when deal.II is
2627 configured to support MPI.
2628
2629 ## I have a special kind of equation!
2630
2631 ### Where do I start?
2632
2633 The deal.II tutorial has a number of programs that deal with particular
2634 kinds of equations, such as vector-valued problems, mixed discretizations,
2635 nonlinear and time-dependent problems, etc. The best way to start is to
2636 take a look at the existing tutorial programs and see if there is one that
2637 is already close to what you want to do. Then take that, try to understand
2638 its structure, and find a way to modify it to solve your problem as well.
2639 Most applications written based on deal.II are not written entirely from
2640 scratch, but have started out as modified tutorial programs.
2641
2642 ### Can I solve my particular problem?
2643
2644 The simple answer is: if it can be written as a PDE, then this is possible
2645 as evidenced by the many publications in widely disparate fields obtained
2646 with the help of deal.II. The more complicated answer is: deal.II is not a
2647 problem-solving environment, it is a toolbox that supports you in solving a
2648 PDE by the method of finite elements. You will have to implement assembling
2649 matrices and right hand side vectors yourself, as well as nonlinear outer
2650 iterations, etc. However, you will not need to care about programming a
2651 triangulation class that can handle locally refined grids in one, two, and
2652 three dimensions, linear algebra classes, linear solvers, different finite
2653 element classes, etc.
2654
2655 To give only a very brief overview of what is possible, here is a list of
2656 the nontrivial problems that were treated by the programs that the main
2657 authors alone wrote to date:
2658
2659  - Time-dependent acoustic and elastic wave equation, including nonlocal
2660    absorbing boundary conditions;
2661  - Stokes flow discretized with the discontinuous Galerkin finite element
2662    method;
2663  - General hyperbolic problems including Euler flow, using the
2664    discontinuous Galerkin finite element method;
2665  - Distributed parameter estimation problems;
2666  - Mixed finite element discretization of a mortar multiblock formulation
2667    of the Laplace equation;
2668  - Large-deformation elasto-plasticity in the simulation of plate
2669    tectonics.
2670
2671 To illustrate the complexity of the programs mentioned above we note that
2672 most of them include adaptive mesh refinement tailored to the efficient
2673 computation of specific quantities of physical interest and error
2674 estimation measured in terms of these quantities. This includes the
2675 solution of a so-called dual problems, that means e.g. for the wave
2676 equation the solution of a wave equation solved backward in time.
2677
2678 Problems other users of deal.II have solved include:
2679  - Elastoplasticity;
2680  - Porous media flow;
2681  - Crystal growth simulations;
2682  - Fuel cell simulations and optimization;
2683  - Fluid-structure interaction problems;
2684  - Time dependent large deformation problems for metal forming;
2685  - Contact problems;
2686  - Viscoelastic deformation of continental plates;
2687  - Glacial ice flows;
2688  - Thermoelastoplastic metal forming;
2689  - Eulerian coordinates problems in biomechanical modeling.
2690
2691 Some images from these applications can be found on this wiki's [[Gallery]]
2692 page. A good overview of the sort of problems that are being solved with the
2693 help of deal.II can also be obtained by looking at the large number of
2694 [publications](http://www.dealii.org/publications.html) written with the help of
2695 deal.II.
2696
2697 Probably, many other problem types are solved by the many users which we do
2698 not know of directly. If someone would like to have his project added to
2699 this page, just contact us.
2700
2701
2702 ### Why use deal.II instead of writing my application from scratch?
2703
2704 You can usually get the initial version of a code for any given problem
2705 done relatively quickly when you write it yourself, since the learning
2706 curve is not as steep as if you had to learn a new library; it's also true
2707 that it's easy to make this code twice as fast as if you had to use a
2708 library. In other words, this sounds like you should write finite element
2709 codes for your problem yourself.
2710
2711 However, you also need to keep in mind that it is the things you want to do
2712 after the first 3 months that will take you forever if you want to write it
2713 yourself, and where you will never be able to catch up with existing,
2714 established libraries: higher order elements; complicated, unstructured 3d
2715 meshes; parallelization; producing output in a format that's easily
2716 visualizable in 3d; adding an advected field for a tracer quantity; etc.
2717 Viewed this way, it's worth remembering that the primary commodity that's
2718 in short supply is not CPU time but your own programming time, and that's
2719 where you will be '''orders magnitude faster''' when using what others have
2720 already done, even if maybe your program ends up twice as slow as if you
2721 had written it from scratch with a particular application in mind.
2722
2723 ### Can I solve problems over complex numbers?
2724
2725 Yes, you can, and it has been done numerous times with deal.II. However, we
2726 have a standard recommendation: consider such problems as systems of
2727 partial differential equations, where the individual components of the
2728 solution are the real and imaginary part of your unknown. The reason for
2729 this is that for complex-valued problems, the product `<u,v>` of two vectors
2730 is not the same as `<v,u>`, and it is very easy to get this wrong in many
2731 places. If you want to avoid these common traps, then the easiest way
2732 around is to split up you equation into two equations of real and imaginary
2733 part first, and then treat the resulting system as a system of real
2734 variables. This also makes the type of linear system clearer that you get
2735 after discretization, and tells you something about which solver may be
2736 adequate for it.
2737
2738 The step-29 tutorial program shows how this is done for a complex-valued
2739 Helmholtz problem.
2740
2741 ### How can I solve a problem with a system of PDEs instead of a single equation?
2742
2743 The easiest way to do this is setting up a system finite element after you
2744 chose your base element, e.g.,
2745 ```cpp
2746 FE_Q<dim> base_element(2);
2747 FESystem<dim> system_element(base_element, 3);
2748 ```
2749
2750 will produce a biquadratic element for a system of 3 equations. With this
2751 finite element, all the functions that you always called for a scalar
2752 finite element should just work for this vector-valued element as well.
2753
2754 Refer to the step-8 and in particular to the step-20 tutorial programs for
2755 a lot more information on this topic. Several of the other tutorial
2756 programs beyond step-20 also use vector-valued elements and there is a
2757 whole module in the documentation on vector-valued problems that is worth
2758 reading.
2759
2760 ### Is it possible to use different models/equations on different parts of the domain?
2761
2762 Yes. The step-46 tutorial program shows how to do this: It solves a problem
2763 in which we solve Stokes flow in one part of the domain, and elasticity in
2764 the rest of the domain, and couple them on the interface. Similar
2765 techniques can be used if you want to exclude part of the domain from
2766 consideration, for example when considering voids in a body in which the
2767 governing equations do not make sense because there is no medium.
2768
2769 ### Where do I start to implement a new Finite Element Class?
2770
2771 If you really need an element that isn't already implemented in deal.II,
2772 then you'll have to understand the interplay between FEValues, the finite
2773 element, the mapping, and quadrature objects. A good place to start would
2774 be to read the deal.II paper (Bangerth, Hartmann, Kanschat, ACM Trans.
2775 Math. Softw., 2007).
2776
2777 The actual implementation would most conveniently start from the `FE_Poly`
2778 class. You first implement the necessary polynomial space in the base
2779 library, then you derive `FE_Your_FE_Name` from `FE_Poly` (using your new
2780 polynomial class as a template) and add the connectivity information.
2781
2782 You'll probably need more specific help at various points -- this is what
2783 the mailing list is there for!
2784
2785 ## General finite element questions
2786
2787 ### How do I compute the error
2788
2789 If your goal is to compute the error in the form `||`u-u<sub>h</sub>`||` in some
2790 kind of norm, then you should use the function
2791 [VectorTools::integrate_difference](https://www.dealii.org/8.3.0/doxygen/deal.II/namespaceVectorTools.html#a01174a2a7e2ee8fa6abdfdd93ac7a317)
2792 which can compute the norm above in any number of norms (such as the L2, H1,
2793 etc., norms). Take a look at step-7.
2794
2795 On the other hand, if your goal is to *estimate* the error, then the one class
2796 that can do this is
2797 [Kelly Error Estimator](https://www.dealii.org/8.3.0/doxygen/deal.II/classKellyErrorEstimator.html).
2798 This class is used in most of the tutorial programs that use adaptively refined
2799 meshes, starting with step-6.
2800
2801 ### How to plot the error as a pointwise function
2802
2803 The functions mentioned in the previous question compute the error as a
2804 cellwise value. As a consequence, the values computed also include a factor
2805 that results from the size of the cell. If you're interested in the pointwise
2806 error as something that can be visualized, for example because you want to
2807 find a pattern in why the solution is not as you expect it to be, what you
2808 should do is this:
2809  - Interpolate the exact solution
2810  - Subtract the interpolated exact solution from the computed solution
2811  - Put the resulting vector into a
2812    [DataOut object](https://www.dealii.org/8.3.0/doxygen/deal.II/classDataOut.html).
2813    This will plot the nodal values of the errors u-u<sub>h</sub> on the current
2814    mesh.
2815
2816 As an example, the following code shows how to do this in principle:
2817 ```cpp
2818   template <int dim>
2819   class ExactSolution : public Function<dim>
2820   {
2821   public:
2822     ExactSolution () : Function<dim>(dim+1) {}
2823
2824     virtual double value (const Point<dim>   &p,
2825                           const unsigned int  component) const
2826     {
2827       return ...exact solution as a function of p...
2828     }
2829   };
2830
2831
2832   template <int dim>
2833   void MyProblem<dim>::plot_error () const
2834   {
2835     Vector<double> interpolated_exact_solution (dof_handler.n_dofs());
2836     VectorTools::interpolate (dof_handler,
2837                               ExactSolution<dim>(),
2838                               interpolated_exact_solution);
2839     interpolated_exact_solution -= solution;
2840
2841     DataOut<dim> data_out;
2842
2843     data_out.attach_dof_handler (dof_handler);
2844     data_out.add_data_vector (solution, "solution");
2845     data_out.add_data_vector (interpolated_exact_solution, "pointwise_error");
2846   }
2847 ```
2848
2849
2850 ### I'm trying to plot the right hand side vector but it doesn't seem to make sense!
2851
2852 In particular, what you probably see is that the plot shows values that are
2853 smaller by a factor of two along the boundary than in the inside, and by a
2854 factor of four in the corners (in 2d) or eight (in 3d). Similarly, on
2855 adaptively refined cells, the values appear to scale with the cell size.
2856 The reason is that trying to plot a right hand side vector doesn't make
2857 sense.
2858
2859 While you plot the vector as if it is function (by connecting dots with
2860 straight lines in 1d, or plotting surfaces in 2d), the thing you right hand
2861 side vector is in fact an element of the dual space. To wit:
2862  - A vector in primal space is a vector of nodal values so that `sum_i  U_i
2863    phi_i(x)` is a reasonable function of `x`. Solution vectors are examples
2864    of elements of primal space.
2865  - A vector in dual space is a vector W formed from the integration of an
2866    object in primal space against the shape functions, e.g. `W_i  = int
2867    f(x) phi_i(x)`. Examples of dual vectors are right hand side vectors.
2868
2869 For vectors in dual space, it doesn't make sense to plot them as functions
2870 of the form
2871      `sum_i W_i phi_i(x)`.
2872 The reason is that the values of the coefficients W_i are not of
2873 **amplitude** kind. Rather, the W_i are of kind amplitude (e.g. f(x)) times
2874 integration volume (the integral `*` dx over the support of shape functions
2875 phi_i). In other words, the sizes of cells comes into play for W_i, as does
2876 whether a shape function lies in the interior or at the boundary. In your
2877 case, the area of the integral when you integrate against shape functions
2878 at the boundary happens to be half the size of the integration area for
2879 shape functions in the interior.
2880
2881
2882 ### What does XXX mean?
2883
2884 The documentation of deal.II uses many finite element specific terms that
2885 may not always be entirely clear to someone not familiar with this
2886 language. In addition, we have certainly also invented our shares of
2887 deal.II specific terminology. If you encounter something you are not
2888 familiar with, take a look at the [deal.II glossary
2889 page](http://www.dealii.org/developer/doxygen/deal.II/DEALGlossary.html)
2890 that explains many of them.
2891
2892 ## I want to contribute to the development of deal.II!
2893
2894 deal.II is Open Source -- this not only implies that you as everyone else has
2895 access to the source codes, it also implies a certain development model:
2896 whoever would like to contribute to the further development is invited to do
2897 so: If you have changes or ideas, please send them to the
2898 [deal.II mailing list](http://www.dealii.org/mail.html)!
2899
2900 This model follows a small number of simple rules. The first and basic one
2901 is that if you have something that might be of interest to others as well,
2902 you are invited to send it to the list for possible inclusion into the
2903 library and use by others as well. Such additions useful to others are, for
2904 example:
2905  - new backends for output in a new graphical format;
2906  - input filters for some kind of data;
2907  - tool classes that do something that might be interesting to use in other
2908    programs as well.
2909
2910 A few projects (some easy, some difficult) can also be found in the
2911 [list of open issues](https://github.com/dealii/dealii/issues), where they
2912 are generally marked as "Enhancements".
2913
2914 If you consider providing some code for inclusion with the library, these
2915 are the simple rules of gaining reputation in the Open Source community:
2916  - your reputation grows with the number and complexity of your
2917    contributions;
2918  - your reputation with the maintainers of the library also grows with the
2919    degree of conformance of your proposed additions with the administrative
2920    rules stated below;
2921  - originators of code are credited full authorship.
2922
2923 In order to allow that a library remains a consistent piece of software,
2924 there are a number of administrative rules:
2925  - there are a number of maintainers that decide what goes into the
2926    library;
2927  - maintainers are benevolent, i.e. in general they want your addition to
2928    become part of the library;
2929  - however, they have to evaluate additions with respect to some criteria,
2930    among which are value for others;
2931  - whether it fits into the general framework (meaning that if your
2932    contribution requires the installation of some obscure other library
2933    that people do not usually have, then that must be discussed;
2934    alternatively, a way must be provided to disable your contribution on
2935    machines that do not have this lib);
2936  - completeness and amount of documentation;
2937  - existence and completeness of error checking through assertions.
2938
2939 However, again: the basic rule is that if you think your addition is
2940 interesting to others, there most probably is a way to get it into the
2941 library!
2942
2943
2944 ## I found a typo or a bug and fixed it on my machine. How do I get it included in deal.II?
2945
2946 First: thank you for wanting to do this! This software project is kept alive
2947 by people like you contributing to it. We like to include any improvement,
2948 even if it is just a single typo that you fixed.
2949
2950 If you have only a small change, or if this is your first time submitting
2951 changes, the easiest way to get them to us is by just emailing the
2952 [deal.II mailing lists](http://dealii.org/mail.html) and we will make sure they
2953 get incorporated. If you continue submitting patches (which we hope you will!)
2954 and become more experienced, we will start to ask you to use
2955 [git](http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Git_%28software%29) as the version control
2956 system and base your patches off of the
2957 [deal.II github repository](https://github.com/dealii/dealii).
2958
2959 The process for this is essentially the following (if you don't quite
2960 understand the terminology below, take a look at the manuals at the
2961 [github web site](https://github.com/), read
2962 [this online tutorial](https://www.atlassian.com/git/tutorial), or ask on the
2963 mailing list):
2964   - Create a github account
2965   - Fork the deal.II github repository, using the button at the top right
2966     of https://github.com/dealii/dealii
2967   - Clone the repository onto your local file system
2968   - Create a branch for your changes
2969   - Make your changes
2970   - Push your changes to your github repository
2971   - Create a pull request for your changes by going to your github
2972     account's deal.II tab where, after the previous step, there should be a
2973     button that allows you to create a pull request.
2974
2975 This list may sound intimidating at first, but in reality it's a fairly
2976 straightforward process that takes no more than 2 minutes after the first
2977 couple of times. But, as said, we'll be happy to hold your hand the first few
2978 times around and help you with the process! There's also a video lecture that
2979 demonstrates 
2980 [how to submit a patch to github](http://www.math.colostate.edu/~bangerth/videos.676.32.8.html).
2981
2982 If you've submitted patches several times and know your way around git by now,
2983 please also consider to
2984   - make sure you base your patch off the most recent revision of the
2985     repository
2986   - you rewrite the history of your patch so that it contains a relatively
2987     small number of commits that are each internally consistent and could
2988     also be applied independently (see, for example, [the discussion
2989     towards the bottom of this
2990     page](https://github.com/dealii/dealii/pull/87)).
2991
2992
2993
2994 ## I'm fluent in deal.II, are there jobs for me?
2995
2996 Certainly. People with numerical skills are a sought commodity, both in
2997 academia and in businesses. In the US, the National Labs are also hiring
2998 lots of people in this field.

In the beginning the Universe was created. This has made a lot of people very angry and has been widely regarded as a bad move.

Douglas Adams


Typeset in Trocchi and Trocchi Bold Sans Serif.